(former) St John the Baptist Anglican Church, West Hobart

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Consecrated 22 May 1856.
Deconsecrated and sold 1998.

Location: Google Maps
Real Estate.com listing for 2011
Photos and background on the organ.

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Colonial Times, 13 August 1853

The Church of St. John the Baptist, Goulburn street, Hobart Town, now in course of erection, is calculated to accommodate 500 worshippers, in a locality where additional Church-room is greatly needed. The present contract is for the erection of the walls only, at an estimated cost of £1800. The contract was made on the 1st September last; and the funds then in hand did not exceed £1200, leaving a deficiency of £600, for which the members of the Building Committee are responsible. But it is supposed that another £600, at least, will be required to roof in the building, and render it externally complete.
The Courier, 2 November 1854

CHURCH MEETING.- On Friday evening, a meeting was held in the School Room, in Goulbourn-street, to take into consideration the measures for completing the interior of the new Church of St. John the Baptist, the Bishop of Tasmania in the chair. The Rev. Mr. Cox, the incumbent of the parish, addressed the meeting at some length, and strenuously advocated that open seats should be adopted, and that pews should be expunged : the reverend gentleman was supported in his views by Messrs. Curwen Walker, Mr. Buckland, the Rev. Mr. Davenport, and the Bishop, who all concurred in the abolition of the pew system. A resolution to this effect was passed ; and a vote of thanks having been given to the Right Reverend Chairman, the meeting separated.
Hobarton Mercury, 2 July 1855

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THE CONSECRATION OF ST. JOHN’S CHURCH

Took place yesterday, according to appointment. The Bishop of Tasmania, with eleven assistant clergymen and a large congregation, took part in the interesting ceremony : His Lordship offering the Prayers peculiar to the act of consecration, the Rev F. H. Cox, as minister of the church, reading Morning Prayer and assisting in the Communion, the Rev Messrs. Buckland and Gellibrand reading the appointed lessons, and Messrs. Irwin and Davenport the Epistle and Gospel; the sermon (from 2 Sam vii 1, 2), being preached by the Bishop. The people’s part, in response and united psalmody, was not the least hearty and touching part of the service. The offerings of the congregation, towards the liquidation of the debt upon the building, were collected by the Revs. Messrs. Seaman and Drew, assisted by the Churchwardens, and amounted to £101.

We would gladly give an account of the architectural beauty and striking effect of the structure thus consecrated, and some notice also of the festive doings by which the parishioners in the evening rejoiced over the completion of their great work, but our present limits forbid us to enlarge. We must be content with expressing the universal feeling of those who had the privilege of taking part in the whole proceedings, that the 22nd of May will be a day long and gratefully to be remembered.
The Courier, 23 May 1856

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This and next photo: former parish hall.

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10 thoughts on “(former) St John the Baptist Anglican Church, West Hobart

  1. Permalink  ⋅ Reply

    Jane edwards

    April 22, 2017 at 8:03am

    I’m the owner of the church hall on Goulburn st, if you ever need to be in touch regarding your project. Glad to see our place included here as part the info on the main church.

    • Permalink  ⋅ Reply

      Monissa Whiteley

      April 22, 2017 at 8:15am

      Thanks for your comment 🙂

  2. Permalink  ⋅ Reply

    Penny Owen

    January 16, 2018 at 4:48pm

    My convict 4x great grandfather married a fellow convict on 22 October 1851 at St. John the Baptist, Hobart Town. Can you tell me please if there is still a church to visit dating back to 1851 as I have read that the Baptist church now known as Pendragon Hall was only consecrated in 1856. I am visiting Hobart from the UK in March. Thanks.

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      Monissa Whiteley

      January 16, 2018 at 11:05pm

      I haven’t properly looked into it, but I believe they used what was later the church hall (the smaller building in the lower photos) as a church then. The previous commenter might be able to help you with that.

      • Permalink  ⋅ Reply

        Jane Edwards

        May 7, 2018 at 9:06am

        I only just saw this, but your information would be correct. At that time, services, etc, were held in the church hall, or Chapel of Ease.

    • Permalink  ⋅ Reply

      Jane Edwards

      May 7, 2018 at 9:07am

      Dear Penny Owen. I’m the owner of the Church Hall on Goulburn St. If your date is correct, your forebear would have been married in our hall, which served as the Chapel of Ease, of temporary church, while the big one down the road was built, after a period of fundraising for such. I hope this helps. Jane Edwards

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      Rick Murray

      September 12, 2020 at 8:33pm

      My great, great, grandfather, a Colour Sergeant in the 99th Regiment of Foot, was married there in 1850.

  3. Permalink  ⋅ Reply

    Mike Law

    August 5, 2018 at 9:08pm

    Hopefully you can answer my question. I’ve read through the comments and posted news articles and it appears that the original pews were ‘expunged’. That seems to be a strange decision for the furnishing of a brand new church but maybe I’m misunderstanding the news article. So what was the church building used for prior to 1853?

    Mike

    • Permalink  ⋅ Reply

      Monissa Whiteley

      August 13, 2018 at 6:07am

      I think they’re just saying do away with the idea of pews, rather than referring than referring to actual existing pews.

  4. Permalink  ⋅ Reply

    Barbara Abbott

    September 5, 2018 at 5:59am

    My great- grandfather Richard Patterson carved the Last Supper in St John the Baptist Church. My question is: Is it still in the building or if not have you any idea where it might be? If it is still there would I be able to view it?
    I look forward to a reply.
    Regards,
    Barbara Abbott

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