James Craig, Barque

This is an old post with small photos. I have better photos now but more pressing things to work on, so if you're interested, comment below and I'll push it to the top of the "To Do" list.

Stern
James Craig aka Clan McLeod, iron barque, built 1874, and used for general cargo. In the 1920s, she was sent off to end her days as coal hulk in Recherche Bay, although soon after that she was abandoned and beached. There's a photo from that period on the Sydney Heritage Fleet website, along with more information. She was rescued in 1972, restored and then relaunched in 1997, and now lives in Sydney when they're not visiting other ports.


These photos were taken at the 2005 Wooden Boat Festival in 2005 (obviously an ocean-going ship). These are my first "sailing ship" photos so there's not as many as usual 🙂 and I can't remember many of the details, so most of them don't have captions unless I can tell what they are from the photo. Also, the camera doesn't like dark-hulled ships.

Foredeck
"Fo'c'sle Deck" the sign says.

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Polly Woodside, Barque

Polly Woodside aka Rona
Iron barque, built 1885 in Belfast.
647 tons, 192 feet long, max speed 14 knots.

A trading ship, coal mostly, from the end of the era of sail, although she remained in use to the 1920s, when she was converted to a coal hulk.

Original Photos
Under sail
Under sail, from a different angle
"Three masted barque about to be broken up on the rocks."
"On Her Way To The Seclusion Of Hulkland"
Before restoration

Second

We're going to start at the bow, walk down the starboard side, then back along the port side. Then we'll go below, have a look at the hold and then the aft accommodation.


Bow sprit

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Diving Suit

These images come from Chums, an illustrated magazine for boy . Being an illustrated boys' paper, it is full of articles & illustrations about cameras, bicycles, sports and a regular column where the writer visits/takes a ride on some interesting devices. In the November 1892 issue, his adventure was deep sea diving, from which this images comes. I've also included the description of the diving suit.

Diving

Every rag of my own clothing did I put off, and then in turn I put on these things. A guernsey of the thickest wool, and a pair of drawers equally thick. The guernsey was tied securely about my waits, and when I had begun to think that I had enough wool on me to face a Scotch winter, I was coolly given another guernsey, and another pair of pants of identical thickness, and make to put them on over the others. I did so, and feeling duly uncomfortable, was given a small red woollen cap to draw over my ears, and a thick pair of stockings which came quite up to my hips. Then they told me that I might get into the tight india-rubber over-dress -- a garment made to fit the shape, and composed of the stoutest sheet india-rubber.

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Mail van

From Chums, 4 January 1893


OK maybe there is a bit more to it. So, here is A Run with the Mail Van:

The Western Mail is one of the most remarkable trains in this country. It leaves Paddington station each evening at nine o’clock, and goes its way to the Land’s End like a great feeding machine, supplying in its transit nearly every western town with letters. It was with this train that I was to journey, and at half-past eight o’clock I found myself in Paddington Station, chatting with Mr. King, the superintendent of the two mail vans, the general custos rotulorum, and the especial guardian of all the important documents and parcels which go from London by this mail. The whole scene was then very busy. The terminus glowed with dozens of fine huge electric lights, porters were bawling, passengers were hurrying, luggage was being hurled here and there, a great express locomotive was being backed against the night express, and all was confusion, bustle, and method.

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Carriage House, Entally

Entally Estate: the original house was built 1819 and modified over the following decades. The yards at the back have a number of farm buildings constructed over the same period, including this carriage house and stable building.


The stable area is on the right. The carriage area is on the left.

This a rough plan to give an idea of the relationship between the different parts of the building. The area over the back is more storage for carriages, that faces onto a different yard.

Photos of stable & tackroom

CARRIAGE/COACH HOUSE


Door on left goes through to a small room (Livery or Coachman's room the panel says).


This room has a fireplace and, to the right, stairs that lead to the upper level.


Upstairs.


Door for loading grain etc. to be stored up here.

Stables, Entally

Entally Estate: the original house was built 1819 and modified over the following decades. The yards at the back have a number of farm buildings constructed over the same period, including this carriage house and stable building.

The stable area is on the right. The carriage area is on the left.

This a rough plan to give an idea of the relationship between the different parts of the building. The area over the back is more storage for carriages, that faces onto a different yard.

Photos of coach storage area

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Richmond Gaol


Richmond Gaol was built in Tasmania in the 1820s as part of Governor Arthur's reform of the convict system.

In one of the rooms is a model of the buildings as they are now, so I'm borrowing that to show everything in relation to everything else.

1 Entrance
2 Courtyard
3 Original gaol building
4 Men's solitary
5 Smaller courtyard
6 Cookhouse
7 Women's solitary
8 Women's room
9 Gaoler's house

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Duyfken

This is an old post with small photos. I have better photos but more pressing things to work on, so if you're interested, comment below and I'll push it to the top of the "To Do" list.

Replica 16th century Dutch ship

Duyfken

Duyfken is a replica of a small ship sent by the Dutch East India Company to explore beyond the known. In 1606 they charted the Cape York Peninsula (the big, pointy bit in the top, right corner) on the first recorded voyage by Europeans to the Great South Land.

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Music Saloon, P.S. Gem

Music Saloon on P.S. Gem, at the Swan River Pioneer Settlement.
From information panel on door:

MUSIC SALOON
The Music Saloon was added in 1982 to cater to the needs of the increasing number of passengers who travelled on cruises and holidays and wanted somewhere on the boat where they could entertain themselves. It was fitted out with a piano and passengers would play and sing old favourites, hymns and popular songs of the period. In the summer the windows could be opened to provide cooling ventilation and in the evening they could be closed to keep the chill, and the relentless mosquitoes, out. The Music Saloon would have been a very pleasant place to spend a chilly afternoon behind the glass which wraps around three sides.

Leaving saloon

Paddle Steamer Cabin

Larger image

Cabin on P.S. Gem, at the Swan River Pioneer Settlement.

From information panel:

PASSENGER CABINS
For all her luxurious fittings elsewhere, the cabins on the Gem were simple and straightforward, if not a little on the small size. It was joked that cabins were kept deliberately small in order to reduce the number of mosquitoes that had to be killed before settling down for the night. Not all passengers had even this level of comfort in their accommodation; deck passengers essentially purchased only standing room on the passenger deck. They would have to find their own berth for the night, usually an uncomfortable one, lying on the deck cargo of wool bales. barrels or crates. At least the crew had folding bunks!

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