Bird in Hand (4) – Shamrock – Victoria (4)

Brisbane & George Streets
81 Elizabeth Street

march-2016
81 Elizabeth St, Match 2016

Formerly Half-Moon
1845 Adam Yates, Bird in Hand, George Street
1846 Patrick Cunningham, Bird in Hand, George Street
1847 Daniel O’Donell, Bird in Hand, Elizabeth Street
1848 William Grosvenor, Bird in Hand, Elizabeth Street
1850-54 George Summers, Bird-in-hand, Elizabeth Street
1854-57 John Bailey, Bird-in-hand, Elizabeth Street
1857-60 James Spencer, Bird-in-Hand, Elizabeth Street
1861-62 Edward Spencer, Bird in Hand, Elizabeth Street
1863-64 Richard Gee, Bird in Hand, Elizabeth Street
1865 Jeremiah Foley, Bird in Hand, Elizabeth Street
1865 Jeremiah Foley, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1867 John Tynan, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1870 Thomas Woods, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1871 Elizabeth Woods, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1871 Frederick Hollingsworth, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1883 John White, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1883-84 John Clydesdale, Shamrock Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1884 John Clydesdale, Victoria Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1885-86 Charles Dalwood, Victoria Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1887-95 Michael Lawler, Victoria Hotel, Elizabeth Street
1895+ Elizabeth Jessamine Lawler, Victoria Hotel, Elizabeth Street

Known as Burnie Hotel from 1909-1919. Seems to have been last licensed in 1919. In 1924 it was converted to a Trades Hall.
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Cornwall Coffee Rooms

Bathurst & York St
Charles Street?
Paterson St.  Approximate location on Google Maps.

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Paterson St, December 2016. The Coffee Rooms adjoined the old Examiner building  (the red, white & yellow building), so on the site of the brick and glass addition.

Paterson St, 1940s (low two-storey building, two doors along from the National. Tall brick building is the Examiner building).
Paterson St, 1970 (on the left).

1843 George Bygrave, York & Bathurst Streets*
1845 George Layton, Paterson St*
1845-51 licensed as the White Horse
1852-54 John Thompson, Paterson St

*I don’t know if these are the same establishment. Continue reading

Enfield Hotel (2)

169 Charles St. Google Maps.

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Now a shop.

Photo while still a hotel (1960s-1980s)
Earlier but poor quality image
1885 street scene, cnr of Charles and York Streets. Charles St runs from the bottom left corner. Enfield must be the third from the corner, next door to the low auction mart building.)

1868-85 Elijah E. Panton, Enfield Hotel, Charles Street
1885-88 Jane Elizabeth Panton, Enfield Hotel, Charles Street
1888+ Edward Henry Panton, Enfield Hotel, Charles-street. Continue reading

White Horse (2)

Paterson Street. Approximate location on Google Maps.

Formerly & afterwards Cornwall Coffee Rooms

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Paterson St, December 2016. The White Horse adjoined the old Examiner building  (the red, white & yellow building), so on the site of the brick and glass addition.

1845-46 John Mills, White Horse, Paterson Street
1846 James Johnson, White Horse, Paterson Street
1846-48 Mary Ann Johnson, White Horse, Paterson Street
1848-50 William Hedger, White Horse, Patterson Street


On the left. (Cropped from photo in QVMAG Collection, QVM:2002:P:0014.)

Paterson St, 1940s (low two-storey building, two doors along from the National. Tall brick building is the Examiner building).
Paterson St, 1970 (on the left).
(I know the links aren’t working.)

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Sailor’s Return

Cnr St John & William Streets. Google Maps.


The building marked with a red 1 is the Ship. If the Sailor’s Return is on the corner of St John St and William St and opposite the Ship, it must be the building marked with a red 2. (Click for a larger version. From Smythe, H. W. H., Plan of the town of Launceston, VDL, 1835)

1832 John Dunn, Sailor’s Return, St John Street
1833 William Mellish, Sailor’s Return, St John Street
1835-36 John Tildesly, Sailor’s Return, St John St
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Edinburgh Castle (1)

Elizabeth & Charles Streets
Elizabeth Street

The notices below include an advertisement for a property on the corner of Elizabeth & Charles Street next door to the Edinburgh Castle, whereas earlier locations are given as “Charles Street” or “Elizabeth and Charles”. Now, it’s possible for a building one form the corner to described as being on the corner of Charles & Elizabeth, people aren’t always precise, but a Elizabeth St frontage away from the corner wouldn’t given as Charles St. So the premises have moved (from a corner site to the Elizabeth site, or from Charles Street to Elizabeth St, or both. The former seems most likely, c.1839).  According to George Fuller, the Edinburgh Castle was located just along from the SW corner of Charles and Elizabeth Street, approximately here.

1831-36 Robert Brand, Edinburgh Castle, Charles Street
1836-39 Henry Reading, Edinburgh Castle, cnr Charles & Elizabeth Streets
1839-40 Richard Chugg, Edinburgh Castle, Elizabeth Street
1840-47 Henry Reading, Elizabeth Street
Moved to corner of Bathurst & Frederick Streets
Building became Good Woman Inn.


Launceston Advertiser, 28 September 1831

Cornwall Chronicle, 15 October 1836
Cornwall Chronicle, 15 October 1836
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British Hotel

NE corner of Wellington & Balfour Streets. Google maps.

Home to what seems to have been Launceston’s first theatre (1834, see advertisements below). Became the colonial hospital in the early 1840s, and then the public Cornwall Hospital until the construction of the Launceston General Hospital in 1863.

1832 Alexander Rose, British Hotel, Wellington Street
1833 Henry Davis, British Hotel, Wellington Street
1834 Thomas Massey, British Hotel, Wellington Street
1835-36 John Hamilton Jacobs, British Hotel, Wellington Street


Launceston Advertiser, 28 September 1831

Although this says Charles St, the license is granted for the following year (1832) and Rose is signing himself as the proprietor of the British Hotel, Wellington Street in May 1832 (see first ad below).

British Hotel Launceston Advertiser, 9 May 1832
Launceston Advertiser, 9 May 1832


The Independent, 6 April 1833
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Lamb and Flag — Bird in Hand (3) — Verandah Wine Vaults

SE cnr York and Bathurst Streets. Google maps.

1833 Thomas Butcher, Lamb & Flag, Launceston
1834 Thomas Butcher, Lamb & Flag, Launceston
1835 Hector McDonald, Lamb and Flag, Launceston
1836 John Waddle, Lamb and Flag, Bathurst St
1836 John Jordan, Lamb and Flag, Bathurst St
1837 Lamb and Flag, Bathurst & York Streets
1842 Edward Brown, Bird-in-Hand, Bathurst and York Streets
1843 Cornwall Coffee Rooms
1844 Thomas Dudley, Verandah Wine Vaults, Bathurst and York St*
1846 Edward Broderick, Freemason’s Tavern?**
1847-56 William Smart, Lamb and Flag York and Bathurst Streets
1856 Christina Smart/Marsden, Lamb and Flag York and Bathurst Streets
1856 Abel Blades, Lamb and Flag, York and Bathurst Streets
1860 Abel Blades, Lamb and Flag, Wellington and York streets.
1862-63 John Nunn, Lamb and Flag, Wellington and York streets.
1869-72 (at least) lodging house

*In December 1845, Dudley is advertising his Verandah Wine Vaults as being the former Hibernia Hotel, also in Bathurst St. However the annual licensing list for September 1845 has him at “Bathurst and York” so I am going to assume he changed locations in late 1845, until shown otherwise

**Edward Broderick is listed in the annual licensing acts with either Lamb and Flag or Freemason’s Tavern. He was refused a license because he was believed to have left the colony and “there were two applications, one by Broderick and another by a new applicant”, so the licence was refused. Prior to this, the Freemason Tavern is listed as being in Brisbane St, in a building that is vacant and for sale in 1846. At the same licensing meeting, an application by Edward Lawrence was refused for a license for the “Patriotic Six” on the corner of Bathurst and York St, for an old licensed house, formerly known as the “Freemason’s Tavern. Possibly then Broderick briefly transferred to the site of the Lamb and Flag, before skipping the colony.

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Launceston Advertiser, 19 May 1836 Continue reading

Lame Dog — Golden Lion — Prince Alfred — Tamar Hotel

39 William Street. Google maps.

Currently, a visitors centre for nearby Boags Brewery.

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1831 George Radford, William Street
1832-33 George Radford, Lame Dog, William Street*
1833-41 George Radford, Golden Lion, William Street*
1841-44 George Radford Jnr, Golden Lion, William Street
1844-46 Richard Wicks, Golden Lion, William Street
1846-48 George Radford Snr, Golden Lion, William Street
1848-53 Mary Radford, Golden Lion, William Street
1853-61 John Bowater, Golden Lion, William Street
1862-63 James Ley, Golden Lion, William Street

1866-68 Thomas Flude, Golden Lion, William Street
1868 J. F. Hobkirk (Insolvent Estate)
1868-69 Frederick Jones, Prince Albert Hotel, William Street
1869 Arthur Jones, Prince Alfred Hotel, William Street
1869 William Fisher, Prince Alfred Hotel, William Street
1870 Robert Miller, Prince Alfred Hotel, William Street
1870 Medmer Lushington Goodwin, Prince Alfred Hotel
1871-74 Abraham Banks, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1874-89 Benjamin Crow, Tamar Hotel, Wellington St
1880-83 Steel Trail, Tamar Hotel, Wellington St
1883-89 Andrew Anderson, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1889-93 Edward Holehan, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1893-96 William Stephen Bassett, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1896-97 Vincent Warrington, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1897 Michael Tierney, Tamar Hotel, William Street
1898-1900 William Douglas Burns, Tamar Hotel, William Street

*I’m not sure if the Lame Dog became the Golden Lion, but in October 1833 Radford gives his address at “Lame Dog, William Street” and two months later, he’s granted a licence for the Golden Lion, so even if he constructed a new building to be the Lion, there is a continuity of ownership.

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From a lecture by Mr. E. Whitfield, 1897
At the foot of George-street there was a ferry, and near that ferry stood another public house. It was named the “Lame Dog.” Poor doggie, is depicted on the signboard, was a deplorable looking object with oneleg in a sling, and beneath were the lines:
“Step in my friends and rest awhile,
And help a lame dog over the stile.”

The Tamar Hotel, in William-street, was once known as the “Golden Lion,” but prior to that it went by the name of the “Sawyers’ Arms.” Here [on the sign] two able-bodied sawyers were seen working at a pit, and the words beneath were-“Halt, mate, let’s drink.”
Launceston Examiner, 6 February 1897

From  response to Mr Whitfield’s lecture by William King:
I should like as briefly as possible to point out where Mr. Whitfeld is at sea re public houses. In the first place he says the Tamar Hotel was at one time the Sawyers’ Arms. Now, Sir, a man named Radford, who had been a soldier, built this house, obtained a license, and named it the Golden Lion. I am quite sure it was not at any time the Sawyers’ Arms. The two-story building opposite the Park gates, with a verandah top and bottom, was the Sawyers’ Arms, kept by Antoni Martini. In the year 1842 he let it to a man named Clark, who was a leading cricketer in those days; and he removed the license to the Royal Oak, corner of Brisbane and Tamar streets.
Launceston Examiner, 17 July 1897

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