** Star Inn/Hotel

Charles St, Launceston. Google Maps.

Incomplete

1840-41 Bernard Sweeney, Star Inn [transfer]
1842-49 Bernard Sweeny, Star Inn, Charles Street
1850-54 Mary Sweeney, Star Inn, Charles street
1854 John Joseph Moore, Star Inn, Charles Street
1854 Henry Bevan, Star Inn, Charles Street
1854-59 John Joseph Moore, Star Inn, Charles Street [new]
1859-60- John Sheridan

1870- Charles Cooley, Star Hotel, Charles-street

-1877-1885 William Chester

1885-1890- Hannah Chester, Star Hotel, Charles-street

WP_20160114_13_47_35_Pro

Charles St, 1885, with Star Hotel on the far right.

WP_20151127_11_46_36_Pro
(November 2015)

 

From “Launceston Police Report”:
This was an information brought on by the Chief Constable against the defendant, the landlord of the Star Inn, Charles street, for neglecting to keep his outer door closed on the evening of the 12th March last. Mr. Rocher, who appeared for the defence, endeavoured to have an informality in the information, which the bench overruling, the case proceeded. The evidence in support of the information stated, that Mr. Byron und two petty constables went to the house of the defendant between seven and eight o’clock on Sunday evening, the 12th of March last, and that in one room there were no less than ten soldiers drinking and smoking, five pots and eleven glasses being on the table, containing as the witness supposed, malt liquor. In another apartment, a prisoner of the crown, employed in the marine department, was quietly seated, taking his wine and water, in company with a ticket of leave-man, who, it was stated, resided at Mr. Sweeney’s. The evidence for the information having been gone through, Mr. Rocker insisted that nothing wag proved against his client respecting not keeping his outer door closed— had the’ charge been for tippling, it would have been different. ..The Bench would not admit of Mr. Rocher’s objection, but called upon him to prove, if he could, that the parties were bona fide travellers or guests of the landlord. Nothing daunted «t the difficulty, Mr. Rocher proceeded with his case, and called first the government man that was taken out of the house (and who appears to be a, man of good character,) ,. and fully proved that the said1 man was there by Mr. Sweeney’s
invitation to dinner, &c. and was bona fide a visitor. To overcome the military part of the business, Mr. Rocher called one of the soldiers, who stated that himself and some of his comrades called at Mr. Sweeney’s on the evening in question, and requested to be served with liquor; that Mr. Sweeney declared his inability to serve on a Sun day, but, being an old soldier himself, he would not see them want for a glass of beer, and as he could not sell them any, why, out of regard to the cloth, he would make them a present of a gallon of ale, and accordingly it was in the midst of their enjoying the said ale, that Mr. Byron and his deputies popped suddenly upon them. No money was paid for the beer so drank, and several of the party were to corroborate the witness, if necessary. The Bench felt inclined to believe the defence. Captain Gardiner sagely remarking, that no doubt Mr. Sweeney was throwing out a sprat to catch a salmon. — The case was accordingly dismissed.

Launceston Courier, 27 March 1843

Census entry, 1843 (CEN1/1/67)

STAR, INN
CHARLES STREET. LAUNCESTON.
BERNARD SWEENEY, grateful lo his friends and the public generally far the liberal support given him for several years past, in soliciting a continuance of their favours, begs most respectfully to intimate that, in addition to the previous accommodations, he has made extensive alterations, amongst which are four capital well-furnished bed-rooms.
Also, a large sitting-room, well adapted for the reception of a family from the country, or commercial gents, who may have private business to transact. There is an excellent five-stalled stable, with gig houses, A careful ostler always in attendance.
N.B.— Country settlers will find the “Star Inn” well adapted for a temporary residence. Parties boarded by the day or week.
B. S. is determined to spare neither pains nor expense to deserve the patronage of his friends, feeling assured that a strict attention to business, punctuality, and au earnest desire to promote the comfort of his customers, will ensure the support it will be his study to deserve, and pride to acknowledge.
October 28.

Cornwall Chronicle, 30 October 1847

Census entry, 1848 (CEN1/1/99)

Death, Bernard Sweeney, 2 December 1849, RGD 35/1/16 no 117
Marriage, Mary Sweeny & John Joseph Moore, 12 February 1854RGD37/1/13 no 1004
Hobarton Guardian, 29 March 1854

From Mary Sweeney, Star Inn, Charles-street, to John Joseph Moore. The police magistrate intimated that since the annual meeting Mrs. Sweeney had been married to Mr. Moore. Transfer granted.
Hobarton Guardian, 6 May 1854

From “Transfer Day”:
From John Joseph Moore to Henry Bevan, “Star Inn,” Charles street. The chairman enquired if applicant understood that the transfer could only be granted to the end of the year; to which Major Welman replied – “Sure he is one of the government officers, and he knows.” Granted.
Launceston Examiner, 7 November 1854

From “Annual Meeting of the Justice of the Peace”:
John Joseph Moore, “Star Inn”.—-The Police Magistrate stated he knew of no objection to this application, save one started a few days ago viz. : that there was a shop containing a few books and stationery attached to the premises. He had visited the premises very recently, and it appeared to him that the shop was a very temporary affair, and there was no communication with it from the house ; only through the back yard.
The Chairman read the 35th. clause of the Act referring especially to this point. Dr. Casey said he should oppose this application, he drew attention to the abstract impropriety of the Act : being evaded by allowing a shop to be kept on the premises of a licensed house. The applicant was the Editor of an inflamatory Newspaper, and this shop was kept as an office and for the sale of the Papers in direct violation of the Act of Council in it was part of the premises of the Star Inn. He knew nothing could be. advanced against the house it had a considerable country connection ; he did not object to the proprietor, and only made the remarks for the public benefit and in a spirit of equity.
Mr. Moore requested permission to state that the clause of the Act referred to, had nothing to do with the granting of the License; had he been brought up, and convicted at any time of a violation of the law, it would be a different matter. Dr. Casey had made two charges against him, it was only necessary to refer to the first, that of keeping a shop for the sale of newspapers. Mr. Moore declared that no paper nor anything else had ever been sold there, and explained the position, the shop had originally been a passage to the back premises, this he had temporarily roofed over, and placed a window in the front where he exhibited his newspaper for, the benefit of poor persons who could not afford to purchase one, and he regretted, that any gentleman upon the bench could make a statement that was not true. Who had ever bought a paper in’ the shop? he defied Dr. Casey to prove what he said on the bench In reply to Captn. Drew, Mr. Moore said that neither he nor any one else ever entered that shop for the purpose of buying a paper. After some discussion amongst the magistrates the license, with the exception of Dr. Casey’s vote, was unanimously granted.
The People’s Advocate, 3 December 1855

From “Annual Licensing Meeting”:
John Joseph Moore, Star Inn. Dr. Casey drew attention to the thirty.-fifth section of the Act, which prohibits the keeper of a licensed house from having a shop on his premises. ‘That prohibition applied to the applicant, who had a shop adjoining his house, and it certainly applied to such an objectionable occupation as that of editor of an Inflammatory newspaper. After some discussion as to whether the shop formed part of the premises in the sense Intended by the Act, Mr. Moore stated that It had no connection with the house, and was merely used as a paper store, and not for the sale of newspaper or stationery. In reply to Major Welman, the chairman stated that the Act did not prohibit a holder of a license from following any other occupation. Captain Drew was of opinion that as no Information laud been laid against the applicant on the ground referred to, the license ought to be granted, which was accordingly done.
Launceston Examiner, 4 December 1855

From “The Municipal Assessment”:
J. J. Moore,; “Star Inn,” Charles-street, 2001. Mr. Moore submitted that he was over rated, both as to the value of the premises and by comparison with properties in the same street. The Mayor said 60l. had been added for improvements, but the amount was the same as at the last assessment. Mr. Moore said he had intended to have appealed last year, but was too late. Alderman Weedon observed that the promises at the corner of Charles and Patterson-streets, occupied by Mr. Davis, were assessed at the rate of 1301., although far inferior to Mr. Moore’s. Reduced to 1601.
Launceston Examiner, 1 April 1856

From “Licensing Meeting”:
Star Inn, from J. J. Moore to John Sweeney.
Mr. Rocher appeared for the applicant and stated the ground of the application as being to protect the license, Mr. Moore having left the colony, and not being likely to return.
Some discussion took place as to the power of the bench to grant a transfer in the absence of the holder of a license, it being the opinion of several justices that
they had not the power.
Mr. Rocher withdrew the application.
Launceston Examiner, 3 May 1859

Launceston Examiner, 26 May 1859

Mr Wecdon sold at his rooms yesterday, the following property of the late D Robertson, Esq:—The Star Inn property to Mr John Sheridan, for £1610; Mr Ward’s shoe shop to Mr Wm Stepney, £960; the allotment in the rear to Mr John Sheridan, £345 ; the property adjoining the Black Horse, in Wellington street, to Mr John Cameron, £510; allotment (lot 8) with house, Mr D Room, £500 ; lot 6, Mr P Miller, £270; two small allotments at the rest, £20 cash. The Brisbane street property was sold to Mr John Knight for £505; allotment of two acres at George Town, to Mr W Johnstone for £100.
Hobart Town Advertiser, 4 June 1859

launceston-examiner-4-august-1885
Launceston Examiner, 4 August 1885

** Ship Inn (5)

Wharf

(Dates to come)

1860 John Mason, Ship Inn, Wharf


Cornwall Chronicle, 4 January 1860

Mr. Jn. Mason, landlord of the “Ship Inn,” Queen’s Wharf, with his usual liberality, and with the view of encouraging healthy and harmless athletic amusements, has given a reward or prize of a very handsome pair of mounted pistols, to be rowed for in three Watermen’s boats, (Sisters, Green Linnet, and Jubilee), by some of his amateur aquatic friends at five o’clock this evening. The boats to start from Green’s Wharf round the second pile in Tea Tree Reach and pull back to Green’s Wharf. From the known skill of the pullers and aptitude of the little coxswaine, an interesting half hour’s contest is anticipated.
Cornwall Chronicle, 28 January 1860

The Annual Licensing Meetings will be held on Monday next. Amongst the application is one from Alfred Stephen Harris for a license to the house at the corner of Bathurst and York-streets, formerly “Lamb and Flag.” Mr Hely intends to alter the designation of “The Ship Inn,” Wharf, to that of “The Duke of Edinburgh,” and Mr Walter Harris intends to alter the title of his new premises at the corner of Charles and Patterson-streets from “The Turf Hotel” to “The Plough Inn.”
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 November 1867

Ship Inn (1)

1823 Nathaniel Lucas
1824-25 Nathaniel Lucas, Ship Inn

From a lecture by Mr E. Whitfield. 1897 (not always the most accurate source):
In 1820 came the first public house, “The Black Swan,” kept by G. Burgess, corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets. Then came in 1823 the Launceston, the Plough Inn, kept by W. Field, where Hart and Sons are now, and the Hope and Anchor, kept by Nat. Lucas. The Launceston Hotel, was built by Richard White, familiarly known as “Dicky White.”
Launceston Examiner, 6 February 1897

In 1823, Nathaniel Lucas receives a license for an unnamed house. In 1824, he is given a licence for the Ship inn (no location given).

Tasmanian & Port Dalrymple Advertiser, 19 January 1825
Tasmanian & Port Dalrymple Advertiser, 19 January 1825

Read more

Currency Lad

Brisbane Street
Bathurst & Frederick Streets

1834 John Biles, Currency Lad, Brisbane Street
1835 John Biles, Currency Lad, Bathurst & Frederick Streets ( Gardener’s Lodge)
1835 Edward Symonds, Bathurst St

Independent, 6 September 1834
Independent, 24 September 1834
Launceston Advertiser, 19 March 1835
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 May 1835

Original building demolished:

Launceston Advertiser, 6 August 1835

The Information and Complaint of John Peers who being sworn saith–I reside in Launceston and carry on business as a Builder in Partnership with Thomas Twinning–About three months ago Thomas Twinning and myself purchased of George Hamilton certain premises in Brisbane Street which were Known as the Currency Lad Public House We shortly afterwards pulled down the House and other premises attached to it, for the Purpose of improvement, and during the Progress of pulling it down, a quantity of Timber, consisting of flooring boards was feloniously stolen.
1 January 1836
(QVMAG MS154 B 18)

Fox and Hounds

Paterson Street

1834-35 Isaac Tibbs, Fox and Hounds, Paterson Street

The Independent, 6 September 1834

Horse Shoeing and Farrier
MR. PETTIT, next door to the Fox and Hounds, in Paterson Street, begs leave respectully to acquaint the Inhabitants of Launceston, and the Settlers generally that he has commenced business in the above line, having recently arrived from Hobart Town, where he has carried on business with much satisfaction to his employers for a considerable time. All orders with which he might be favored will be carefully attended to.
N. B. — His charges will be very moderate.
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 February 1835

Cornwall Chronicle, 25 July 1835

Noah’s Ark

cnr Margaret & Brisbane Streets

1859 Alfred Fowler, Margaret and Brisbane Streets
1859-1860 Robert Cotton, The Ark, Margaret and Brisbane Streets transfer
1860 Alfred Fowler, Ark, Margaret and Brisbane Streets transfer
1860 Patrick Torley, The Ark, Margaret and Brisbane-streets

From assessment rolls, southern side of Brisbane Street, possible eastern corner.

LICENSING MEETING
Alfred Fowler, premises in Brisbane and Margaret-streets.
The Police Magistrate said the house was not in a fit state to be occupied, much more to hold a license, and was not wanted in the neighborhood ; there was the Hibernia
Inn and the Elephant and Castle near.
Refused as not necessary.
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1858

Alfred Fowler appealed against the decision of the licensing meeting, refusing to grant a license to new premises at the corner of Margaret and Brisbane-streets, on the grounds that it was not necessary and that it was not in a fit state to be occupied. After a little discussion, a license was granted.
Launceston Examiner, 4 January 1859

BREACHES OF THE LICENSING ACT. — Robert Cotton was charged on information by Mr. Superintendent O’Connor with abandoning the “Noah’s Ark” Inn, the license of which he held, and Robert Fowler was charged with selling liquors on the said premises without a license.
Launceston Examiner, 28 February 1860

Read more

Young Queen

Elizabeth Street

1844 Stephen Murphy, Elizabeth Street
1845 Stephen Murphy, Elizabeth Street
1846 Richard Wicks transfer
1846 Refused

Application for music and dancing license:
An application from Stephen Murphy, of the ‘Young Queen,’ Elizabeth-street, was refused ; not having a room in the house adapted for such a purpose.
Launceston Advertiser, 8 January 1846

To the Editor of the Cornwall Chronicle.
Sir, — When I have had business at Launceston I have been accustomed to stop at Mr. —s, the “— —,” in — street. I went there on Saturday-night, August 8, where I had stopped the two preceding nights. This was about shutting-up time for publicans, some being shut up as I passed along the streets and some not, but when I came to the “— ,” it was shut. I knocked at the door, and it was immediately opened by Mr. — — . I went in through the bar into the little parlour, where the family and customers frequently sit, and after sitting a few minutes I said to Mr — , “well, I think I’ll have a glass of beer, and smoke my pipe, and be off to bed.” In four or five minutes be brought the beer in and I paid him for it, and when I had smoked my pipe and drank up my beer, I asked Mr. — for a candle, which he gave me, and bidding him “good night,” I went up stairs to my bedroom; but instead of immediately undressing myself, I sat as near as I can judge about a half an hour, looking into two little books; but feeling very sleepy, I undressed myself, set a chair to my bed-side, and put the candlestick on it, so as to be able to reach to put the candle out after lying down. Just at the time I bad taken the candlestick in my hand to put the light out, Mr. — came into the room very gently; he did not speak at the very moment, but seemed confused, as I thought; after collecting himself be said, “I’m come up to see if you have lost anything. Is your money all right?” I said “yes, for anything I know, it is, but I’ll see,” and getting up I examined my trousers pocket, and took my silver out and laid it on the table, saying “that’s all right, there should be nearly a pound’s worth and there’s not far short by the appearance of it,” but did not count it. He then said, “where’s your other money : where’s your pocket book .” I said “that’s right I know, for I had it in my hand a few minutes ago, and it was right then, and its contents too,” but to satisfy him, I took my book from my inside waistcoat pocket and laid it on the table, saying ” that’s right” but did not open it. He then said, “you’re sure all’s right?” and I told him “all’s right.” He then said, “you’d better fasten your door inside, here’s a bolt under the lock. I tried to shoot the bolt but could not, as the end of the. bolt would not reach into the box, so that the door was only closed by the common spring bolt. I then returned to bed, but before I put the light out I said within myself, “I’ll not leave my book lying on the table,” and put it under my pillow, and then put the light out, and was soon too fast asleep, How long I slept I am unable to say, but when I awoke, or was awakened, I found myself in the most excruciating pain at my stomach, and so sick that I thought my heart must and would come up; still I could throw nothing up, though I tried every means I was able. I tried to get up and get to the door, and call for help, but the giddiness in my bead was so great that 1 could not even sit up in my bed, which seemed to turn round in the quickest motion, and what is singular I retained the possession of my senses. How long the pain continued so very violent I cannot exactly say, but to the best of my judgment about two hours, when it was a little easier, and I fell asleep again, and slept till daylight, still being very unwell. A few minutes after I awoke, I got up, end after dressing myself I took my silver from the table and counted it, and put it in my pocket. There was 19s. 6d. 1 then went to the pillow for my book, and it was not there. I then turned the bed clothes down, supposing , it had worked down further into the bed, but it was not there. I then turned the bed down, and found it between the bed and mattress. I immediately perceived it had been opened, from the stiring that passes round it being tied very different to the manner I always tied it myself, and on opening it I found my money was gone. I immediately went down stairs and said to Mr ? — , “”what reason had you for coming into my room to inquire about my money last night?” He answered, “you went out here last night with one of the biggest rogues in the country (but I now think I left a bigger one in.) and I thought he might have picked your pocket, and you might not find it out before morning, and then you might think you had been robbed here. I should not have come up, but the young man that lodges here recommended me to come on that account.” I answered, “that man I can clearly exonerate, as I changed a note at the “— Tavern” more than an hour after he left me, and my money was all right then; and I never was in any company afterwards, or in any house whatsoever, until I came in here.” Shortly after I saw Mrs. — , who said, ” well, you’ve been done to-night?” “Ah,” said Mr. — , “he says he’s been robbed of his money, and says he’s lost it here.” “Ah,” answered Mrs. — , “I thought he’d lost it last night, that made me send you up-stairs to see about it.” I then turned to — and said, “I understood the young man that lodges here wished you to speak to me about it.” Here he was evidently much confounded, and falteringly said, “no, it was my wife,” and she repeated the words “it was me that sent him up,” and here the conversation ended. Now,
Sir, several inferences may be drawn from the above account, as to who was the rogue; but as I am but little judge about such matters myself, 1 must beg of your readers to judge for me.
A Wayfarer.
August 19 .
Cornwall Chronicle, 22 August 1846

To the Editor of the Cornwall Chronicle.
Sir, — Having seen a letter in your last Saturday’s newspaper, signed, ” A Wayfarer,” having reference to some dishonest conduct on the part of an Innkeeper, and being informed that I am the person intended, I beg to call your attention to the real facts of the case, which are, altogether different, from those which have been stated. About three weeks ago, Saunders came to my house, and remained three days; on the Saturday afternoon he went out, and returned with a common prostitute, whom Mrs. Wicks would not allow to enter the parlour behind the bar; she then went away; he remained a little while, and drank a class of beer, and then went out again : this was about three o’clock in the afternoon; he came back again about five o’clock with a person whom he represented as the steward of the City of Sydney; he then told me he would go by the City of Sydney to Port Phillip (instead of to Adelaide); they drank four glasses of ale each; he brought out his pocket-book in the presence of this man, and looked at some papers; he (the steward) immediately induced him to leave my house, for the purpose of engaging his passage per City of Sydney; on their leaving, the remark was made, “that the man who had just left was imposing on Saunders, as the steward of the City of Sydney was a Chinese boy, and formerly cook to Mr. Raven;” I intended at that moment to prevent his going out, but had occasion to go into the tap-room to serve a customer; he left before I came back again into the parlour; he returned again shortly after ten o’clock — very drunk; his right eye cut and bleeding; he accounted for it by. saying, “the woman had done it who followed him this afternoon.” On being asked, what induced him to go into her company after Mrs. Wicks expostulating with him this afternoon? he said, “he went into a house to take a glass of ale with the steward, and during the time he was there, this woman came in, and struck him in the eye with an umbrella;” he then sat down on the sofa — appeared thoughtful and uneasy in his manner, so much, that three people who were present remarked it; after sitting about half an hour, he went to his bed; the parties who were in the parlour requested me to go up and see if he had lost anything, as they suspected something was not right — both from his manner and his constant manner of “flashing” his pocket-hook; I went up; he was sitting up in bed with the candle close to the curtains; I requested him not to put the light so near the bed; he said he was going to read a book; I said I have come up to see if your money is all right; he got out of bed and took from his trowsers pocket some silver; lie said he had changed a pound; I said there is nearly a pound’s worth there; I then asked him if his pocket book was all right; he took it from his waistcoat, but repeatedly refused to open it in my presence, saying he knew it was all right; I requested him to bolt his door; he attempted to do so, but on account of the door not being sufficiently close, it did not catch; I then held it for him on the outside until he had securely fastened it. I told the persons in the parlour that Saunders said his money was all correct. In the morning he asked the reason for my asking him if he had his money all right; I said, he seemed so uneasy that I and the other persons present suspected he had been robbed by the same parties who cut his eye; he then said he had lost three one pound notes, and that his money was quite correct when he changed the note, but be would go back to the place and see if he had dropped it; on his return he said the landlady had told him he wrapped up his pocket-book again, and lost nothing there; he then accused the young man who slept in the next room of taking it; I told him it was impossible, as his room-door was fastened on the inside while I was present, and that I had afterwards tried it; he then started for the White Hills; he had been gone about half an hour when he returned and asked me the name of my lodger, saying also, “I have turned back to put you on your puard against him, for I am confident it is he who has robbed me; I again told him the man could not get into his room, and we both went up stairs to examine the state of the lock, and found it in proper order, never having been forced; I again told him he must have lost his money when in company with the man and woman; he replied, “certainly I was in liquor, I might have dropped it when I changed the pound note;” he then left, and returned in about a week and remained until Friday the 21st; and during the whole of the five days he remained here, the last time, he never once mentioned the subject; he left on Friday, without saying a word or paying his bill. He lost money before, about twelve months ago, at the “Golden Lion;” he went out with a female and returned saying he had been robbed. John Kanes, Mr. Noble, painter, and a young man formerly storekeeper to Mr. Stuart Harvey, were the parties to whom I have referred as being in the parlour when I wept up stairs, end can prove that instead of my going up quickly, I ran up in my usual manner, and they heard me open the door.
— I remain, Sir, your obedient servant,
Richard Wicks.
August 29.
Cornwall Chronicle, 29 August 1846

Richard Wicks, Young Queen, Elizabeth-street — House dirty and ill-furnished, and strongly suspected of dishonest practices.
Mr. Jocelyn Thomas stated that a man in his employ had gone into Wicks’s, where he had his beer drugged and was afterwards robbed; it was a most scandalous proceeding.
Mr. Dry wished to know if the statement of the man who had been robbed, brought home a moral conviction in his (Mr.Thomas’) mind as to the guilt of Wicks.
Mr. Thomas. — It did, for the man is about one of the few whom I would believe.
Mr. Tarleton had taken the depositions in the case, and he had not the slightest doubt of Wicks’s guilt, although the charge could not be legally brought home to him.
Mr. Dry.— I hope such conduct will be marked in the strongest manner possible, I was aware of these circumstances before, and entertain the same impression as Mr. Tarleton — unanimously refused.

Cornwall Chronicle, 2 September 1846

Appeal against previous decision:
Richard Wicks, ‘Young Queen,’ Elizabeth Street. Mr. Rocher for appellant.
Mr. Rocher said the license was refused on account of ineligibility of premises, in connection with a charge made by a servant of Mr. J. B. Thomas’s, that he had been supplied with drugged spirits in the house, and robbed. Mr. Rocher called Mr. Bartlett, the publican, who stated that the man referred to had called at his house on the day referred to, in company with two loose women, and was intoxicated; and the counsel argued that the probability was the robbery complained of had been committed by them.
Captain Neilly and Friend stated that they had visited the house, since the annual meeting, and it was in every way suitable; but Mr. Atkinson said that the house was not properly furnished, and Mr. Bartley pointed out the fact that the house was not at all requisite in the neighbourhood.
Captain Gardiner, Mr. Sams, Mr. Wales, and Mr. Sinclair spoke in favour of a reversal of the decision of the annual meeting; but on the votes being taken, the decision was confirmed by 13 votes to 9.
Launceston Advertiser, 24 September 1846

** Dover Castle — Wheelwrights’ Arms — Victoria (3) — Volunter

SE cnr of George & Brisbane Streets. Google Maps.
demolished 1969

Incomplete

1837-42 William Major Grayling, Dover Castle, Brisbane Street
1842 Thomas Archer, Dover Castle, Brisbane Street
1842-44 George Leech, Dover Castle, Brisbane Street
1844 George Leech, Dover Castle, Brisbane & George Streets
1845-51/2 Samuel Feutril, Wheelwrights Arms, George and Brisbane
1852-55 Samuel Feutrill, Victoria Hotel, Brisbane & George streets
1855 Mrs Feutrill, Victoria Hotel
James Lewis
1856 Robert McCarthy, Victoria Hotel, Brisbane and George streets
1858-61 John King, Victoria Hotel, Brisbane and George streets
1862 Frederick Jones, Victoria Hotel, Brisbane & George Streets
1864 Frederick Jones, Volunteer Hotel, Brisbane and George-street.

WP_20160121_14_13_33_Pro
Location (January 2016)

“View of the Volunteer Hotel, corner of George Street and Brisbane Street, Launceston, Tasmania, featuring a red square on the front of the building showing the proposed position for a new sign, c 1936,” QVMAG collection, QVM:1993:P:0394
“Corner Brisbane & George Streets – Volunteer Hotel”, Lloyd George Web, Libraries Tasmania

PUBLICANS’ LICENSES — A Bench of Magistrates assembled in sessions at the Court House, on Monday last, to consider applications for fresh Licenses and Transfers. The Dover Castle was transferred from William Major Grayling to Thomas Archer; the Sir William Wallace Inn, from Britton Jones to Joshua Lyons; the Cornwall Hotel, from Loftus Dickenson to Henry Palmer; the Waterloo Tavern, George Town, from G. Wilson to Jonathan Stammers Rudkin; a new license was granted to Edward Blown, for the Lamb and Flag, York-street, and two applications for houses at Patterson’s Plains were refused, on the grounds of not being required for the public accommodation.
Cornwall Chronicle, 12 February 1842

From “Quarterly Licensing Meeting”:
Mr. S. Feutrill obtained a license for the Wheelwright’s Arms, the house formerly occupied by Mr. George Leech, as the Dover Castle
Launceston Examiner, 5 November 1845

From “Publicans’ Licenses”:
The Victoria Hotel, corner of Brisbane and George-streets ; permission to continue the business of her late husband was granted to Mrs. Feutrill.
Launceston Examiner, 6 November 1855

John King, Victoria Hotel, Brisbane and George streets.
The Police Magistrate remarked that reports were frequently made of applicant not keeping a light in front of his house at night. He had once been fined for this breach. There were similar reports against many other publicans.
Theo Chairman trusted that all licensed victuallers would take this as a general warning.
License granted.
Launceston Examiner, 10 December 1861

Cornwall Chronicle, 31 May 1862
Cornwall Chronicle, 31 May 1862

Hibernia–Verandah Wine Vaults–Jubilee

72-74 Bathurst Street.  Google Maps.
SE cnr Brisbane & Bathurst Streets. Google Maps.


Bathurst and Brisbane St, 2009.

1835 Josiah Pitcher, the Hibernia, Bathurst Street
1836-38 Josiah Pitcher, Hibernia/Hibernian Inn, Launceston
1839-40 Joseph Fossey, Hibernia Hotel, Bathurst Street
1840-41 Walter Hobson, Hibernia Inn/Hotel, Bathurst Street
1841-42 John Green, Hibernia Hotel, Bathurst Street
1842-45 William Lewis, Hibernia Hotel, Bathurst Street
1845 Edward Potts, Hibernia Hotel, Bathurst Street
1845-46 Thomas Dudley, Verandah Wine Vaults, Bathurst St
1846-47 Michael O’Meara, Hibernia, Bathurst Street
1847-49 Benjamin Walford, The Hibernia, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets**
1849-61 John Green, Hibernia (Inn), Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1862-85 Jane Green, Hibernia Inn/Hibernian Hotel, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1885-86 Alfred Green, Hibernia Inn, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1886-97 George Green, Hibernia Inn, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1897 Francis Green, Hibernia Hotel, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1898 Walter David Johnston, Hibernia Hotel, Brisbane & Bathurst Streets
1898+ Walter David Johnston, Jubilee Hotel, Brisbane and Bathurst streets
**Change of location

Later Victoria Hotel. Now (2017) Irish Murphy’s. The current Art Deco facade dates from the 1930s. I can’t find any photos prior to this.

Photo 1942 (Jubilee Hotel, as best I can tell.)
Photo 1991


2009

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Bull’s Head

Wellington Street, Sandhill/South Launceston
SW cnr Charles & Brisbane Streets. Google Maps.
Charles Street
NW cnr Charles and York Streets. Google Maps.

1834-36 William Collins, Bull’s Head, Wellington Street/Main Road
1836-43 William Collins, Bull’s Head, Charles & Brisbane Streets
1843-50 William Duncan, Bull’s Head, Charles & Brisbane Streets (burnt down)
1850 William Duncan sen., Bull’s Head, Charles Street
1851-57 William Duncan, Senr., Bull’s Head, Charles and York Streets
1857-58 Alexander Duncan, Bull’s Head, Charles and York Streets
1858-66 John Burns Thompson, Bulls’ Head, Charles & York Streets
1866-71 William Tuner, Bull’s Head, Charles & York Streets
1871 Henry Millbank, Bull’s Head, Charles & York Streets
1871 Elizabeth Woods, Bull’s Head, Charles & York Streets


Cornwall Chronicle, 19 September 1836


Cornwall Chronicle, 3 December 1836

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