Turf Hotel – Plough Inn (3)

Cnr of Charles & Patterson Streets (site of National Theatre)
Built ? (1854?)

Mw1_0566
Location.

Photo of Charles & Paterson Streets, 1880s. Starting on the right the buildings along Charles St are Star Hotel; a two-storey shop; a gap where Paterson St crosses, then Plough Inn, a single=storey building on the corner.

There were at least three buildings licensed as the Plough Inn. William Field, one of the first hoteliers in Launceston, had a Plough Inn in Brisbane St in the 1820s. After that, until 1864, the Plough Inn was in Charles St, where it was the terminus for coaching services. After the Plough ceased operating, the name was transferred to the Turf Hotel, on the corner of Patterson & Charles St, which at the time was in the hands of Walter Harris, a previous licensee of the Charles & York property.

? -1867 Caroline Rawlings
1867-69 Walter Harris
1870-86 Thomas Wadham, Plough Inn, Charles and Patterson streets.

Annual Licensing Meeting, Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1866
Annual Licensing Meeting, Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1866

Cornwall Chronicle, 2 January 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 2 January 1867

Cornwall Chronicle, 5 October 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 5 October 1867

Cornwall Chronicle, 19 October 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 19 October 1867

The Annual Licensing Meetings will be held on Monday next. Amongst the application is one from Alfred Stephen Harris for a license to the house at the corner of Bathurst and York-streets, formerly “Lamb and Flag.” Mr Hely intends to alter the designation of “The Ship Inn,” Wharf, to that of “The Duke of Edinburgh,” and Mr Walter Harris intends to alter the title of his new premises at the corner of Charles and Patterson-streets from “The Turf Hotel” to “The Plough Inn.”
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 November 1867

Annual Licensing, Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867
Annual Licensing, Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867

Cornwall Chronicle, 21 December 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 December 1867

THE New Plough Inn— Mr. Walter Harris, formerly of the Plough Inn, central Charles-street, the St. Leonards Inn, Patterson Plains, subsequently of New Zealand and at present host of the Plough Inn corner of Charles and Paterson streets, Launceston, has commenced tho manufacture of Ginger beer Lemonade, Soda Water, and Tasmanian cordials in the premises formerly occupied by Mr W, H, Rawlings, where he purposes giving his friends and the public generally the benefit of his skill in compounding tho newest things in fashionable and refreshing drinks, cordials and liqueus.
Cornwall Chronicle, 25 December 1867

Launceston Examiner, 26 December 1867
Launceston Examiner, 26 December 1867

Upon the application of Thomas Wadham for a license for the Plough Inn, Charles and Patterson streets, the Superintendent said that it remained in the same state as last year, and was unfit for a licensed house, and had been allowed to go to decay.
Mr. C. C. Gilmore, on behalf of the applicant, urged that the building was in good enough condition ; there was plenty of ventilation, and if the license was not granted it would deprive the applicant of his livelihood.
Mr. Carter said that as licenses had been granted other houses where there had not been sufficient accommodation he should vote for it.
Mr. Hudson said that for the last seven or eight years the same objection had been raised against granting the license.
Mr. Ditcham said that as the records in other cases had been disregarded, and the applicant
was a respectable man, he should vote for the license being granted.
Mr. Collins said that at the last annual meeting he had given a pledge that Mr. Wadham would not again apply unless the improvements required were carried out. and he had therefore declined to appear for the applicant upon the present occasion. He understood, however, that the property was about to be sold, and, if so, Mr. Wadham might be able to get the necessary improvements made.
Mr. Belstead thought they would do no harm in granting the license if Mr. Wadham would distinctly promise that he would have the house put in proper condition before the next meeting.
Mr. Murray said be intended to be silent about Mr. Wadham, but for the last ten years the house had been objected to, and for the last two years the Bench had decidedly told Mr. Wadham that if he did not get his house improved they would not grant a license, and he differed from the justices who were in favour of granting the license on the ground that records in other cases had been disregarded. No record equal to that against Mr. Wadham had been made.
The case was reserved until the conclusion of the other business. when the justices retired and privately considered the matter, and ultimately the license was granted on the distinct promise from the applicant that the house should be improved to meet the requirements of the law by next meeting.
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1885

An application was made to restrain the town surveyor from pulling down part of the Plough Inn, in Patterson street, which has long been condemned as past repair. The town surveyor had received instructions to serve the necessary notice on the occupier to pull down the building within 14 days, and the notice not having been complied with, the law requires that the building should then be demolished under the direction of the town surveyor.
The Mercury, 26 January, 1887

North Western Chronicle, 3 October 1887
North Western Chronicle, 3 October 1887

ANOTHER old colonist has passed away in the person of Mr. Thomas Wadham, of the Retreat Inn, Mowbray, who was found dead in his bed early yesterday morning, having succumbed to an illness from which he suffered for some time past. The late Mr. Wadham was a colonist of over thirty years standing, and in partnership with Mr. G. Paine formerly carried on business as a coachbuilder in premises in Charles street now used as a paint-shop in connection with the Launceston Carriage Works. Relinquishing this occupation he became landlord of the Plough Inn, situated at the corner of Charles and Patterson streets, but about two years ago, on the closing of this establishment, he removed to the premises where his death took place. Mr. Wadham and several members of his family took an active part in connection with musical matters and societies for a number of years, and his son, Mr. Walter Wadham, is now a well-known musician in England. The deceased was in his 65th year.
Launceston Examiner, 4 June 1889

Collapse of a Drain. — A rather sudden collapse yesterday of a drain which runs under the pathway near where the old Plough Inn once stood, at the junction of Patterson and Charles streets, caused a ugly hole to be made right in the centre of traffic.
Daily Telegraph, 28 September 1889

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*