Madame Caradini

Death has been busy of late with our great public singers. The last who has joined the great majority is Madame Carandini. In Australia, and particularly in Adelaide, no songstress was better known and more highly esteemed. It was Madame Carandini who was one of the first ladies to introduce operas in this colony and,…

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Mrs Smith

Years ago, when the sports gallery at the museum was being created, Louise (collections manager) wanted to know a bit more about Mary Smith, so I found this article by Irene Schaffer. Mary is another widow who continued on managing her property after her husband died, but of more interest, she trained and raced horses…

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Mrs Roberts

(Hobart Zoo, from a photo at the State Library of South Australia.) PERSONAL It is with regret that we have to announce the death yesterday of Mrs. Roberts, of ”Beaumaris” Hobart. She was in her 81st year. When well advanced in age, she developed a hobby for zoological studies, and established at her home a…

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Women of Hobart

I’ve been a bit slow with my “Random Women” posts lately and I noticed some ads for various women’s businesses while I was looking for something else, so I thought I’d share some. All from Colonial Times, 14 December 1849; via Trove. (The last/fifth one is interesting.)      

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Mary

Considering the idea of the Victorian woman as submissive, chaste and obedience, with a case study: Mary Townsend, who in middle of the century lived in Launceston, with her husband William. Mostly. CAUTION– I hereby caution the public against harboring or giving credit to my wife Mary Townsend after this date she having left her…

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Isabella

Here’s a couple of memos from the overseer at the Cascade Female Factory (which was the city women’s gaol by then, but with the same name). Cascade Factory 10 Sept 1858 Sir I have the honor to bring under your notice that the Soldiers are constantly prowling about the Hill in the rear of the…

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Mrs Cox, the end

Part I Part II PART III: DEATH OF GUARD & THE END OF BUSINESS ANOTHER SERIOUS COACH ACCIDENT.-AS Mrs. Cox’s coach was proceeding to Hobart Town on Thursday last, an accident occurred at Oatlands which had well nigh proved fatal. It appears that the horses, after being changed, were, through gross negligence, left to take…

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Mrs Cox, the middle

Part I PART II: THE MAIL, A NEW RECORD (or: How long did it take to get from Hobart to Launceston?) , RIVALRY & DANGEROUS DRIVING MAILS.–We are happy to state that the Postmaster-General, as well as Mr. Browne, will in future embrace every opportunity of forwarding foreign mails by Mrs. Cox’s coach. We are also informed…

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Mrs Cox, the beginning

This too far longer than I thought. I had a couple of news stories, but I thought I’d have a quick look to see if there were any more. Just a few 🙂 I left out those that complaining about the state of the road or fares, or short references to accidents and some repetitive…

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Mrs Hood

Writing in 1888, a columnist in the Launceston Examiner had the following paragraph. Evandale has sustained a further loss of good old Mrs. Hood, perhaps better known as Mrs. Morrison. When, as such, she went home to England in 1853 she assisted several persons from her native place(Leicester) to emigrate to Tasmania, and also imported…

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