The future is coming, um, came

1834 Glasgow-Paisley Steam Carriage, Source. Taking a break because I have to share this. ENGLISH EXTRACTS STEAM CARRIAGE. In the Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on Steam-carriages, it is observed, that the time is not very distant when a complete alteration will take place in the means of inland conveyance….

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The Coming of the Car

The demand upon horse traction, which diminished somewhat after the introduction of the safety bicycle receives another check by the importation of automobiles. The first one to come to Tasmania was landed at Hobart on December 24 from the s.s. Papanui to the order of Dr. F. J. Walden, of Sorell being imported by his…

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On the numbering of houses in Launceston

From 1833 Police Act and 1838 Police Act: “From time to time to allot a number to each house in every street or pubic place with the said Towns which number the occupier of every house is hereby required to paint or affix or cause to be pained or affixed in legible characters upon the…

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An Act to regulate the Police in certain Towns and Ports within the Island of Van Diemen’s Land and to make more effectual provision for the Preservation of the Peace and its Dependences generally

Passed by the [Legislative] Council 14 November 1838 A list of offences, summarised. It is not lawful to paste or otherwise affix any placard or other paper upon any wall house or building without consent of the owner or occupier It is required that houses and buildings be fitted with gutters or otherwise constructed to…

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Lady Church(ing)

A PAINFUL POSITION.-An unmarried lady, a perfect specimen of an old maid, being on a visit to a friend who lived in a large manufacturing town, went one Sunday to church alone, and was shown into a large pew, in which half a dozen females were seated. The prayers were drawing to a conclusion, when…

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Tea, the war & evacating Darwin

While looking for something else, I found an ABC article about tea, which at the end mentions tea rationing during World War II, and an accompanying increase in petty theft: “Never mind the Japanese are about to invade, this tea rationing was [seen as] totally unrealistic and unreasonable.” So I went to see what was…

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Criminal Side: theft of horses

Israel Shaw, Abraham Crabtree, John Sinclair, and John Marshall were charged with having stolen on the 30th May, one horse value £8, and two mares value £14. the property of Joseph Terry, residing at Westbury. William Bates, resides with his uncle Joseph Terry, near Westbury. He recollected coming to Launceston in May last, with one…

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Atomic Golf Balls

Alfred Hoffart (left) and Miriam Busby, of Ohio, America, search for a lost ball with a Geiger counter. A small amount of radio active material under the ball’s cover, causes the Geiger counter to click when the ball is approached. Newcastle Morning Herald, 10 June 1950   ATOMIC GOLF BALLS Australian golfers, especially the less…

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1904, Launceston

(Above) Opening Alexandra Bridge over the Cataract Gorge, 1904 (Weekly Courier, 3 December 1904) (Below) Insides Birchall’s store, 1904 (Weekly Courier, 10 December 1904)

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Stripes Banned On Bullseyes

(Adelaide) News, 3 April 1944 SYDNEY.-The stripes are to disappear from the popular red and-white and black-and-white sweets known as bullseyes. This War Organisation of Industry decision has been conveyed to the manufacturers. The department has further decreed that Sydney’s only sugar pig maker–Mr. Wilton, of Chippendale–must cease making this line and turn to jube-making,…

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