Bricklayer’s Arms–Victoria Tavern (2) –Caledonian (Wine Vaults) (3)

NW corner of George & York Streets. Google Maps.

Later Union Club Hotel & O’Keefe’s.

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Photo 1940s, as the Union Club Hotel

1831 Theophilus Feutrill, York St*
1832 Theophilus Feutrill, Bricklayers’ Arms, George and York-street
1834-38 James Yates, Bricklayer’s Arms, Launceston
1839 James Yates, Bricklayers Arms, George & York Street
1840 Licence refused
1841 Edmund Bartlett, Victoria Tavern, Launceston**
1842 Edmund Bartlett, Victoria Tavern, York & George Streets**
1843-46 Edmund Bartlett, Bricklayers’ Arms, York & George Streets
1847-1848 Edmund Bartlett, Victoria Tavern, cnr York & George Streets
1848-49 William Cook, Victoria Inn, George & York Streets
1850 – refused
1851 George Smith, Caledonian Wine Vaults, corner of George & York Streets (transferred from Charles St)
1852-61 George Smith, Caledonian Wine Vaults, George and York Streets
1862 Mary Ann Smith, Caledonian Wine Vaults, George and York Street
1862 Horace Hepburn, Caledonian Wine Vaults, George and York Streets.
1863 Bryan Coan, Caledonia Wine Vaults, York and George Streets
1864-73 John Mason, Caledonia Wine Vaults, George and York Streets
1874-78 Mary Ann Mason, Caledonian Inn, George and York Streets
1878-7979 Henry King, Caledonian Inn, George and York Streets
1880-1885 William Maltman, Caledonian Inn, George and York Streets
1885+ Margaret Mullane, Caledonian Hotel, York and George Streets

*Theophilus Feutrill was granted a license for unnamed premises in York St, 1831
** Edmund Bartlett previously had the Victoria Tavern in St John St. After moving to the corner of York and George Streets, the two names both seem to be used for the premises licensed as the Bricklayers’ Arms (see below, 1840-42).


Launceston Advertiser, 28 September 1831

Launceston Advertiser, 29 February 1832
Launceston Advertiser, 29 February 1832

Cornwall Chronicle, 3 February 1838
Cornwall Chronicle, 3 February 1838

From “Launceston Police”
Mr. Yates, of the Bricklayers’ Arms, was fined £2 and costs, for an assault on the person of John Pope.
Cornwall Chronicle, 10 February 1838

Launceston Advertiser, 26 December 1839
Launceston Advertiser, 26 December 1839

Launceston Advertiser, 3 September 1840
Launceston Advertiser, 3 September 1840

Mr. Edmund Bartlett, of the Bricklayer’s Arms, appeared to answer for permitting William Clayton, a prisoner of the crown, to be in his licensed house on the night of the 7th November, for the purpose of tippling. Mr. Bartlett admitted, that he had served the man with a glass of beer, which he had not drank when he was taken into custody. Mr. Byron said, that this man Clayton had been the cause of at least half a dozen publicans being fined !!! The Bench sentenced Mr. B. to pay the lowest penalty, one pound and costs. This man Clayton should, from the statement of Mr. Byron, be sent to Port Arthur, it is scandalous that the |Police Magistrate should permit such a vagabond to remain in the district.
Cornwall Chronicle, 18 November 1840

Launceston Advertiser, 11 February 1841
Launceston Advertiser, 11 February 1841

Cornwall Chronicle, 9 October 1841
Cornwall Chronicle, 9 October 1841

Launceston Examiner, 3 September 1842
Launceston Examiner, 3 September 1842

From “Annual Licensing Meeting”:
Edmund Bartlett, Bricklayers’ Arms.-No police objection, but Mr. Tarleton said that lie felt it necessary to state that the house was wholly unfurnished. Mr. Douglas explained that the applicant’s furniture had lately been sold off under distraint for rent, but if the license were granted Mr. Bartlett would lie enabled to refurnish the house. Mr. Sams spoke of Mr. Bartlett as one of the most respectable of the licensed victuallers, with a large family, and lie thought it would be cruel to visit a misfortune with a penalty. Dr. Pugh also supported the application. Other justices demurred, not objecting to Mr. Bartlett personally, but to the “principle of licensing an unfurnished house.” Mr. Douglas enquired whether in case of a new application, they would require the house to be furnished before granting a license; if not, the objection against this house should fall to the ground. Mr. Bartlett was called, and in reply to questions, stated, that it the license was granted he should be enabled to furnish the premises ; he was the oldest licensed victualler in town, having snow held a license fir fifteen years. The question was put to the vote, and a majority were in favour of granting the license.
Launceston Examiner, 5 September 1846

Launceston Examiner, 4 September 1847
Launceston Examiner, 4 September 1847

Cornwall Chronicle, 30 September 1848
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 September 1848

Cornwall Chronicle, 8 November 1848
Cornwall Chronicle, 8 November 1848

Cornwall Chronicle, 26 May 1849
Cornwall Chronicle, 26 May 1849

From “General Annual Licensing Meeting”, 1880
William Cook, Bricklayer’s Arms, corner of York and George streets.–refused, on the ground of being badly conducted.

Prior to taking into consideration the fresh application the case of William Cook, of the Victoria Tavern,’ York and George-streets, was discussed, whose application for a renewal of his license had been negatived by a majority of six ; five having voted for, and eleven against. The chairman stated “that he considered Cook a most incompetent person to keep a licensed house ; there had been two convictions.” After mooting other objections as to the disreputable characters resorting to the house, Mr. Rocher who appeared on behalf of applicant, observed that licensed houses were for the benefit of the lower classes, as well us others, and it is well known that Cook’s house is not frequented by the aristocrats ; with reference to the convictions, it was in Cooks’ favor, for if the house had been so badly conducted, how was it that there had not been more than two convictions, and what were they; one for twenty-five shillings, the other for ten pounds ;— he (Mr. Rocher) contended the meeting ought to renew Cooks’ license.

The chairman still maintained his former opinion, when Major Welman intimated that from his personal knowledge, it was almost impossible for any man in that house (Cooks’) to maintain order ; he should vote for it. Mr. Atkinson concurred with Major Welman. On Mr. Rocher stating that it was necessary that parties should specify on what grounds they negatived the renewal, the votes were again taken, when it appeared that eleven were against a renewal, namely, five on account of applicant’s conduct, five on account of his character, and one (as it was stated) against all three, namely — character, conduct, and premises. There being only five votes in applicant’s behalf the renewal was refused. Mr. Rocher gave notice of an appeal on behalf of his client As there were four fresh applicants, the chairman wished to have the sense of the meeting as to whether they should at once decide or adjourn. Here Mr. Sinclair denied the power of the meeting to adjourn, in which Mr. Evans concurred. (At this stage of the proceedings there were so many speaking at once, in fact ‘”all talkers and no hearers,'”that the reporters laid down their pens). At length Mr. Kennedy read the opinion of the Attorney- General respecting the pow the power of magistrates adjourning the meting for applicants for new licences, by which it appeared that such powerwas vested in them. Mr. Evans considered that it would be an act of injustice to adjourn themeeting on account of Cook; his licence was only suspended, and contended that the adjournment would be injurious to the landlord; putting it on the supposition that Cook loses his licence, his landlord would be injured by the delay in point of rent. On one of the magistrates stating that Cook had lost his licence, ’till the appeal was decided, the licence was in force until the 29th September.
Cornwall Chronicle, 4 September 1850

QUARTER SESSIONS.-On Monday, the justices assembled in quarter sessions to hear the appeal of William Cook, whose license was refused at the last annual licensing meeting. The decision was confirmed, and to fill the vacancy a license was granted to James Lilly, for a new house at the corner of Charles and William-streets, sign the “Salmon and Ball.”
Examiner, 9 October 1850

Examiner, 12 October 1850
Examiner, 12 October 1850

Cornwall Chronicle, 13 October 1852
Cornwall Chronicle, 13 October 1852

Launceston Examiner, 3 May 1862
Launceston Examiner, 3 May 1862

Image_15
Death of George Smith, Licensed Victualler (RGD 35/1/20 #160)

From “Quarterly License Meeting”:
Mrs. Mary Ann Smith’s application to carry on the business of the Caledonian Wine Vaults ‘” at the comer of George and York-streets, under the license issued to her late husband Mr. George Smith, was granted.
Cornwall Chronicle, 5 November 1862

Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862

Cornwall Chronicle, 30 September 1863
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 September 1863

Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1863
Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1863

Launceston Examiner, 23 June 1864
Launceston Examiner, 23 June 1864

Launceston Examiner, 13 October 1864
Launceston Examiner, 13 October 1864

Mr. John Mason’s application for a license for the “Caledonian Wine Vaults,” George and York streets, was granted. He also applied to have the sign changed to that of the “Railway Hotel.” Mr. Gunn objected, as on that day twelve months, they had given permission to alter the sign of the “Cross Keys,” in York-street, to that of the “Railway Tavern.” Mr. Murray suggested that perhaps Mr. Mason would call this “The Manu Trunk Railway Hotel.” Mr. Mason said he would allow it to remain as it was now -“The Caledonian Wine Vaults.”
Cornwall Chronicle, 3 December 1864

The Mercury, 24 November 1866
The Mercury, 24 November 1866

Caledonian Wine Vaults.— Mr T. Mason said that notice had been given at last annual meeting to the landlords of this house and the Prince of Wales hotel, to comply with the requirements of the Art, as to having a sufficient number of rooms furnished and that repairs to the perishes must be completed or the licenses would not be renewed.

The Mayor said he had visited the house and found it in good order and the requisite accommodation had been provided. Mr DeLittle referred to some adjoining tenement let by the applicant to bad characters. He had spoken two years ago about the shocking nuisance this was, and was told the police could not interfere. He then determined to bring the matter before the Licensing Bench, and in 24 hours the whole nuisance was swept away. Since then the house had been again let to disreputable characters, and was only cleared about fortnight before that meeting. The Mayor said he had occasion to pass this licensed house three or four times a day and found it well conducted. The landlord had been deceived in letting the house to a family who turned out disreputable. He had been exceedingly anxious to get them out and had at last succeeded.

Mr Turnbull moved that the license be refused.

Mr DeLittle said as the Superintendent of Police and the Mayor said it was so difficult to get rid of tenants and scenes so objectionable to the respectable portion of the public, he thought it time for the Licensing Bench to interfere. He would second Mr Turnbull’s proposition.

The Chairman put the question to the vote, and declared the license lost by 7 to 5.

Mr Atkinson said he had voted in favor of the license being granted, because there had been no conviction of the applicant. The Mayor said he voted for the license for the same reason, and because he saw nothing objectionable in the way Mr Mason conducted his licensed house. As for letting the other house, he was convinced Mr Mason had been deceived as to the character of the people he bad let it to. Mr Lette said as there were sixteen magistrates present and only twelve voted, he thought the votes ought to be taken again.

This was agreed to, and the license was granted ; the Chairman directing that a memorandum be made of the objections raised against the character tenants who had occupied the adjoining premises.
Cornwall Chronicle, 2 December 1870

Breach of the Licensing Act.— Mr John Mason pleaded , guilty to having allowed on the night of the 10th April, at Launceston, permitting the outer door of his licensed house, the Caledonian Wine .Vaults, .to be open after the hour, of 10 o’clock, for the egress of persons not travellers, &c. Fined £1 and 7s 6d costs.
The Tasmanian, 19 April 1873

From “Annual Licensing Meeting, Launceston”:
John Mason, Caledonian Wine Vaults, George and York-streets.
Mr [Thomas]Mason said he did not wish to oppose the license, but would mention that applicant had been fined £1 during the present year for allowing his door to be opened after 10 ‘clock. The Chairman cautioned the applicant’s wife to be more careful in future
The license was granted.

The Tasmania, 6 December 1873.

Launceston Examiner, 5 May 1874
Launceston Examiner, 5 May 1874

ANOTHER OLD COLONIST GONE.–Our obituary records the death of Mr John Mason at the ripe old age of 70 years. Mr Mason is a colonist of nearly 50 years standing, having arrived at Hobart Town on the 5th November, 1824, and at Launceston on the 19th November of the same year. For many years he was employed as overseer for Major Wentworth on the Tamar, and afterwards for Captain Whiting at George Town. During the last 17 years he was the proprietor of the Caledonian Wine Vaults, where he died on Saturday morning.
Cornwall Chronicle, 16 February 1874

Launceston Examiner, 26 June 1875
Launceston Examiner, 26 June 1875

From “Annual Licensing Meeting”:
Henry King, Caledonia Inn, George and York-streets.
Mr Coulter said these premises were not at present in very good repair. Mr Collins supposed the application, and said the applicant was a former licenses victualler in his town, he having kept the Sportsman’s Hall.

Mr Dowling would not oppose the granting of the application, as he thought the applicant would conduct the house better than the present holder to the license, who permitted Sunday trading.
A raution not to permit Sunday trading having been administered, the application was granted.

Launceston Examiner, 3 Dece 1878

Launceston Examiner, 4 May 1880
Launceston Examiner, 4 May 1880

Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1880
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1880

Daily Telegraph, 8 July 1885
Daily Telegraph, 8 July 1885

Daily Telegraph, 26 October 1901
Daily Telegraph, 26 October 1901

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