Wilmot Arms

Cnr Garfield Street and Wellington Street (Road), Sandhill/South Launceston. Google Maps approximate location
Demolished 1972

SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. Google Maps, approximate location.
Demolished 1894.

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SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. (2015)

Previously Green Gate
1844-47 Nicholas Clark, Wilmot Arms, Sand Hill
–> Moved to site of Black Swan
1847-48 Nicholas Clark, Wilmot Arms, Wellington and Brisbane Streets
1848 Jane Clark/Sullivan, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1849-53 John Sullivan, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1853-54 Daniel O’Donell, Wilmot Arms, Wellington and Brisbane Streets
1854-55 George Summers, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1855-63 John Blades, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1863-66 Charles Page, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1866-68 Alfred John Green, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1868-69 Alfred Stephen Harris, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1869 John Sullivan, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
1870-80 Michael Lawler, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane and Wellington Streets
–> License transferred to former Fire Brigade Inn, Brisbane Street

Photo of Wellington St, with Brisbane St intersection on the very right. The light coloured building on that corner is the Wilmot Arms (name is along the top), which is a facade around the older Black Swan. (Alternate link.)

Extracts from Examiner story, “Colourful Old Hostelries”:
The first hotel in Launceston was the Black Swan, built in 1820, and kept by G. Burgess, an old whaler. It stood on the corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets and was after wards known as the Wilmot Arms before it was pulled down.

In Brisbane St. where the Enfleld (now McClymont’s), Cleary’s (now Tuck’s shop), Wilmot Arms (now a motor garage), Noah’s Ark (at corner of Margaret St.), Glenfield House, Barber’s Hotel (now Routley’s and the adjoining bank) and the Fire Brigade (now the Imperial).
Examiner, 12 March 1946
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Lord Raglan

Bathurst & Wellington St.
Appears to have been at the southern end of Bathurst St, one or two buildings from the corner of Frankland St, on the western side. Google Maps, approximate location

1859-63 Edward Fiddyment, Lord Raglan, Wellington and Bathurst-streets

Edward Fiddyment, from Duke of York, Wellington-street, to premises on the opposite side of the street, to be called the Lord Raglan. Mr. Rocher and Mr. A. Douglas appeared to support the application.
Major Welman stated his opinion in favor of the application on the ground that Mr. Fiddyment was a respectable man and that the house occupied by him at present is in a very dilapidated state, where as the one to which it was intended to transfer the license was a new one.
The Chairman questioned whether they had the power to transfer a license from one premises to other.
Mr. Rocher quoted the section of the Act referring to granting of transfers, and submitted that it was at the discretion of the meeting whether they granted a transfer from one house to another.
Mr. Douglas said that if the house was in such a dilapidated state the Justices would in a manner impose a penalty upon the applicant in refusing to grant the transfer and thereby compelling him to get a new licence; he considered that as the laws in this colony were getting more liberal than they were some years ago the section of the act should have a liberal construction put upon it; and in the applicants case nobody could possibly be a sufferer by the transfer but some would be gainers.
The Chairman observed that the application was made out in the form for a license, not for a transfer; and taking the application to be for a new license it was a question whether they could grant a licence to one already holding a licence. After a little further discussion Mr. Douglas said the application should be taken as an original licence and the applicant could then petition the treasury for a remission of the licence fee. A licence was then granted on the understanding that Mr. Fiddyment closes the premises now occupied by him on his removal to the opposite premises.
Launceston Examiner, 8 February 1859

CAUTION TO THE PUBLIC.
A dreadful row occurred at Fiddyment’s, “Lord Raglan,”on Thursday afternoon, the 26th instant!
Two carters had a quarrel, and went into a paddock on the Cataract Hill-had three rounds in an English manner, then shook hands and made friends. At the time every. thing was quiet, Mr. Sergeant Peters came up and told me that I kept a disorderly house, saying-“Talk about the Cross Keys-this a house is ten times worse.” Now, Mr. Editor, I have been in business these twelve years in h Launceston, since I purchased my discharge from the 96th Regiment, and I think my a character will bear investigation; and perhaps, Mr. Editor, Sergeant. Peters will inform us what brought him in Victoria-street, at the back of my house, on Sunday morning last, a dressed in private clothes, and another gentle man with him, who is living in a house occupied by a person who owes me twenty-five shillings for rent.
Mr. Editor, I have always appreciated the conduct of Mr. Peters, even when he was stationed on the Sand Hill. He puts me in mind a of a gentleman who used to sit on the fence opposite Mr. John Carter’s, to prevent the waggoners and people going into the: house, and as I do not wish to have the same game carried on with me I make these matters public. Query ? Sure it couldn’t be the fire bell was looking after, which has lately escaped from the watch-house up to the Sand Hill ? Should he require to have a ring at it in case I of danger, he can be obliged on application. Sir. Editor, I contribute towards the police–including the house I live in and other property–the amount of nearly 100l per year, and I do not see that I should be humbugged by Mr. Sergeant Peters.
Begging you will be so kind as to insert this in your very valuable journal, you will greatly oblige

Sir, your most obedient servant,
EDWARD FIDDYMENT
May 27.
Launceston Examiner 2 June 1859
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Cross Keys Inn – Railway Tavern

Cnr of George and Cimitiere Streets, possibly north-east corner. Google Maps.
Southern side of York St, between Bathurst & Wellington Streets. Google Maps, approximate location

182930 James Anderson, Cross Keys, George Street
1831- Abraham Lenoy, Cross Keys, George Street
1832-36 Mary Lenoy, Cross Keys, George Street
1837-48 William Brean, Cross Keys, York St
1849 Robert Blake, Cross Keys, York Street
1850-51 Henry Mills, Cross Keys, York Street
1852 Abel Blades, Cross Keys, York Street
1853 James Lewis, Cross Keys, York Street
1856 John West, Cross Keys, York Street
1858 John Partridge, Cross Keys, York Street
1859-62 William Jones, Cross Keys, York Street
1862 Job Haycock, Cross Keys, York Street
1863-67 Edward Spencer, Railway Tavern, York Street
1868-70 William Darcy, Railway Tavern , York Street
1870 George Butterworth, Railway Tavern, York Street
1871 Licence Refused

Dscn3150
Intersection of Cimitiere and George Sts. (Left side is the north-east corner.)
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Three Grand Masters–Shakespeare Hotel

1860-1879: southern corner St John St & the Quadrant Google Maps
1880+: SE corner St John & York Streets. Google Maps.
Later Metropolitan Hotel.

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Location, cnr Quadrant and St John Street.

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Cnr St John and York Streets.

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Cnr St John and York Streets.

Photo, 1940s, as the Metropolitan.

1860-1862 Benjamin Hyrons, Three Grand Masters, Quadrant. G
1863 Thomas Bruff, Shakespeare Hotel, Quadrant name changed
1864-55 Benjamin Hyrons, Shakespeare Hotel, Quadrant
1866 Matthew Wilkes, Shakespeare
1866-67 Mr J. Solomon, Shakespeare Hotel, St John-street
1868-73 Joseph Dyson, sen Shakespeare Hotel, Quadrant
1874-78 Joseph Dyson, Shakespeare Hotel, St. John street and Quadrant
1880-88 Joseph Dyson, sen., Shakespeare Hotel, St. John and York streets location changed
1889-92 William Job Spearman, , York and St. John streets, Shakespeare Hotel
1893-1902 Hugh George Webb, Shakespeare Hotel, York and St John street
1903 Hugh Huston, Shakespeare Hotel, St John-street
1904 Edwin Waller, Metropolitan Hotel name changed
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Black Swan

SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. Google Maps, approximate location.
Demolished 1894

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SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. (2015)

1826 George Burgess, Black Swan, Launceston
1827 George Burgess, Black Swan, Launceston
?-1831 Thomas Caryl, Black Swan (College Arms?), Launceston*
1831-33 Neil Campbell, Black Swan, Brisbane Street
1834 Adam Moore
1835-37 George Archer, Black Swan
1838 William Mason, Black Swan
1839 Thomas Dudley, Black Swan Wine Vaults, Brisbane & Wellington Streets
1840-42 Thomas Dudley, Black Swan, Wellington St/Brisbane St
1843-45 James Childs, Black Swan, Brisbane and Wellington streets
1846 License refused
Became Wilmot Arms

*1830 Thomas Caryl is listed as being granted a licence for the College Arms.

Photo of Wellington St, with Brisbane St intersection on the very right. The light coloured building on that corner is the Wilmot Arms (name is along the top), which is a facade around the older Black Swan. (Alternate link.)

From a lecture by Mr E. Whitfield. 1897:
In 1820 came the first public house, “The Black Swan,” kept by G. Burgess, corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets. Then came in 1823 the Launceston, the Plough Inn, kept by W. Field, where Hart and Sons are now, and the Hope and Anchor, kept by Nat. Lucas. The Launceston Hotel ,was built by Richard White, familiarly known as “Dicky White.”
Launceston Examiner, 6 February 1897

Extracts from Examiner story, “Colourful Old Hostelries”:
The first hotel in Launceston was the Black Swan, built in 1820, and kept by G. Burgess, an old whaler. It stood on the corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets and was after wards known as the Wilmot Arms before it was pulled down.

In Brisbane St. where the Enfleld (now McClymont’s), Cleary’s (now Tuck’s shop), Wilmot Arms (now a motor garage), Noah’s Ark (at corner of Margaret St.), Glenfield House, Barber’s Hotel (now Routley’s and the adjoining bank) and the Fire Brigade (now the Imperial).
Examiner, 12 March 1946

Colonial Times, 13 July 1827
Colonial Times, 13 July 1827
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Turf Hotel – Plough Inn (3)

Cnr of Charles & Patterson Streets (site of National Theatre)
Built ? (1854?)

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Location.

Photo of Charles & Paterson Streets, 1880s. Starting on the right the buildings along Charles St are Star Hotel; a two-storey shop; a gap where Paterson St crosses, then Plough Inn, a single=storey building on the corner.

There were at least three buildings licensed as the Plough Inn. William Field, one of the first hoteliers in Launceston, had a Plough Inn in Brisbane St in the 1820s. After that, until 1864, the Plough Inn was in Charles St, where it was the terminus for coaching services. After the Plough ceased operating, the name was transferred to the Turf Hotel, on the corner of Patterson & Charles St, which at the time was in the hands of Walter Harris, a previous licensee of the Charles & York property.

? -1867 Caroline Rawlings
1867-69 Walter Harris
1870-86 Thomas Wadham, Plough Inn, Charles and Patterson streets.

Annual Licensing Meeting, Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1866
Annual Licensing Meeting, Launceston Examiner, 3 December 1866
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Plough Inn (2)

Charles St, near York St.
1830-1864

There were at least three buildings licensed as the Plough Inn. William Field, one of the first hoteliers in Launceston, had a Plough Inn in Brisbane St in the 1820s. After that, until 1864, the Plough Inn was in Charles St, where it was the terminus for coaching services. The license changed hands often, including returning to an original proprietor. One, Thomas Archer, moved to Carrick and established a hotel by the same name. After the Plough ceased operating, the name was transferred to the Turf Hotel, on the corner of Patterson & Charles St, which at the time was in the hands of Walter Harris, a previous licensee of the Charles & York property.

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Former W. Harts & Sons building that replaced the Plough.
Same building c.1887

Plough Inn
The Plough inn, a part of which still exists in W. Hart and Sons and the adjoining building. The Plough was the meeting place of many notable characters in the old days.
Examiner, 26 June 1931
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Ship Inn (1, 3)

Wharf area, cnr St John & William Streets


Rhe building marked with a red 1 was the Ship and the red 2 is the Sailor’s Return, later Market Tavern. (Click for a larger version. From Smythe, H. W. H., Plan of the town of Launceston, VDL, 1835)

1824-25 Nathaniel Lucas, Ship Inn
?
1827-29 John McDiarmid, Ship Inn, St John St
1829 Patrick Carolan, Ship Inn, St John & William St
–>Moved to Charles Street.
+This site became Commercial Hotel and then Star &  Garter and then Ship again.
1835-37 James Whitehead, Ship Inn, Wharf/St John Street
1837-50 Robert Brand, Ship Inn, St John Street
1851-55 Mary Ann Brand, Ship Inn, St John & William Streets
1855-57 Thomas Wells, Ship Inn, St John & William Streets
1857 Burnt down. New location refused.

In 1824, Nathaniel Lucas, Ship Inn appears in the list of licenses granted, and he is advertising the premises shortly thereafter although there is no indication of the location.

Tasmanian & Port Dalrymple Advertiser, 19 January 1825
Tasmanian & Port Dalrymple Advertiser, 19 January 1825
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