Prince of Wales

NW cnr of Wellington & York Streets. Google Maps.

Previously corner of Paterson & Wellington Streets
1843 John Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, Paterson & Wellington Streets
1844-45 John Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, Paterson & Wellington Streets
1846-48 John Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, York & Wellington Streets
1849-50 Ellen Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, York & Wellington Streets
1851 Albert Locke, Prince of Wales, York & Wellington Steets
to be continued

Photo, 1940s

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John Hinshaw. “Prince of Wales,” corner of Wellington and York streets: no convictions; general conduct good ; but the Police Magistrate thought it necessary to mention that when the chief constable visited the house, he found the landlord under the influence of liquor. Mr. Robertson and Captain Neilley said they found the house clean and respectable. Mr. Tarleton-” Yes, my report says clean and neat, but I thought it right to mention what was reported to me by the chief constable.” Mr. Hinshaw-“That’s what Mr. Midgely never saw me in his life.” Captain Stuart corroborated the statements of the other justices. Mr. Tarleton should not oppose the application, but thought Mr. Hinshaw ought to be cautioned. The Chairman said some thing, and Mr. Hinshaw explained that at the time referred to there was just a joke passed, and nothing further. Granted.
Launceston Examiner, 3 September 1847

Launceston Examiner, 2 September 1848
Launceston Examiner, 2 September 1848

Launceston Examiner, 25 July 1849
Launceston Examiner, 25 July 1849

Launceston Examiner, 5 September 1849
Launceston Examiner, 5 September 1849

RGD-37-1-9 #722
Marriage of Ellen Hinshaw & ALfred Locke (RGD-37-1-9 #722)

Launceston Examiner, 3 September 1851
Launceston Examiner, 3 September 1851

Cornwall Chronicle, 30 November 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 November 1867

Annual Licensing, Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867
Annual Licensing, Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867

Licence Transfers.-William Doodie was granted permission to sell liquors at the Salmon and Ball Inn under the licence held by James Lilly till the next annual licensing meeting. John Findlay was granted permission to sell liquors at the Prince of Wales Inn under the licence held by William Doodie till the next annual licensing meeting.
Examiner, 23 November 1880

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Breach of the Licensing Act.-John Findlay, of the Prince of Wales Hotel, pleaded guilty to having, on the night of the 17th July, permitted the door of his licensed house to remain open after 10 o’clock. Superintendent Coulter explained that the charge had been made through facts that came to his knowledge whilst prosecuting some young men for larrikinism. The evidence disclosed that all parties concerned in the brawls that occurred among the offenders on that occasion were assembled in the house of the accused between the hours of one and two o’clock in the morning. The Police Magistrate said that such proceedings in a great measure encouraged larrikinism. It had been stated during the course of the trial of the young men referred to by Mr Coulter that the accused had harboured one lot of the offenders in one portion of his house, and the remainder in another. He (Mr Murray) felt it his duty to inflict the heaviest penalty the law allowed, which was a fine of £5; but if the sum had been £10, he would have deemed it perfectly right to mulct him in that amount. Such houses might be useful, but if managed badly they became a curse to the community. The Bench would inflict a fine of £5 and costs.
Examiner, 3 August 1881

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Licensing Act.-John Findlay was charged with having, on the 10th instant, permitted card playing to take place in his licensed house, the Prince of Wales Hotel. Sub.-Inspector Sullivan deposed that on the night of Saturday, the 10th inst., he was on duty near the defendant’s house ; entered the place shortly before midnight, and noticed several persons drinking at the bar; witness went into the bar parlour, and saw five men there playing at cards; there was also a florin on the table; witness took up the cards and money, and asked to whom the coin belonged; someone answered that they were merely playing for drinks; witness requested defendant to clear his house, which he did. Sergeant Peters gave corroborative testimony. For the defence Robert Johnson asserted he was in the bar parlour when Sub-Inspector Sullivan entered ; nobody in the room was playing cards at the time ; the cards were in a pack on the centre of the table; it was not mid night when the police came in, as it did not strike twelve o’clock until after witness left the place. The Bench inflicted a fine of £2 and costs.
Examiner, 21 September 1881

From Annual Licensing Meeting:
Joseph Dyson, jun., Prince of Wales Hotel, York and Wellington streets.
Superintendent Coulter reported that the applicant had purchased the property and intended to improve it. He had no objection to the applicant. Mr G. T. Collins appeared on behalf of the applicant and stated that Mr Dyson had no opportunity of effecting improvements on the premises up to that date as the present tenant had not removed. The Mayor said he would like to see most of the houses about the neighbourhood where the Prince of Wales was situated expunged. Superintendent Coulter intimated that four had already been expunged within 150 yards of the place. The Chairman said that at the next licensing meeting the worst of the houses should be expunged as suggested by the Mayor. 
The application was granted.
2 December 1881, Examiner

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