Plough Inn (2)

Charles St, near York St.
1830-1864

There were at least three buildings licensed as the Plough Inn. William Field, one of the first hoteliers in Launceston, had a Plough Inn in Brisbane St in the 1820s. After that, until 1864, the Plough Inn was in Charles St, where it was the terminus for coaching services. The license changed hands often, including returning to an original proprietor. One, Thomas Archer, moved to Carrick and established a hotel by the same name. After the Plough ceased operating, the name was transferred to the Turf Hotel, on the corner of Patterson & Charles St, which at the time was in the hands of Walter Harris, a previous licensee of the Charles & York property.

Mw1_0559
Former W. Harts & Sons building that replaced the Plough.
Same building c.1887

Plough Inn
The Plough inn, a part of which still exists in W. Hart and Sons and the adjoining building. The Plough was the meeting place of many notable characters in the old days.
Examiner, 26 June 1931

1830 Richard Lawson, Five Al?s, Charles St
1831 Thomas Marriott, Plough Inn, Charles St
1832 Thomas Marriott, Charles St
1833 Thomas Marriott or George Lucas (no locations given)
1834 George Lucas, Plough Inn, Launceston
1835-37 James Hopkins, Plough Inn, Launceston
1838 Thomas Archer
1839-44 Charles Grant, Plough Inn, Charles Street
1845 Richard Lawson, Charles St, Launceston
1846-47 John Mills, Charles St
1848-49 James Hann, Charles St
1849-52 Thomas Lawson, Charles St
1853-55 John Sullivan, Charles St
1855 Thomas Walch
1856-57 Henry Wilton, Charles St
1857-59 Walter Harris, Charles St
1860 John Sullivan, Plough Inn, Charles street. Granted.
1861-2 John Sullivan, Plough Inn, Charles street
1862-64 Daniel Lawson, Plough Inn, Charles St
1865 now W. & F. Hart, Ironmongers
1867 Turf Hotel is renamed Plough Inn

Launceston Advertiser, 29 September 1830
Launceston Advertiser, 29 September 1830

Hobart Town Courier, 7 May 1831
Hobart Town Courier, 7 May 1831

Cornwall Chronicle, 16 April 1836
Cornwall Chronicle, 16 April 1836

Cornwall Chronicle, 6 August 1836
Cornwall Chronicle, 6 August 1836

Cornwall Chronicle, 26 November 1836
Cornwall Chronicle, 26 November 1836

Hobart Town Courier, 17 August 1838
Hobart Town Courier, 17 August 1838

Colonial Times, 21 August 1838
Colonial Times, 21 August 1838

Cornwall Chronicle, 11 May 1839
Cornwall Chronicle, 11 May 1839

Another inquest was held on Tuesday evening, the 28th instant, at the Plough Inn, Charles-street, on the body of an infant child of Mr. Archer, the landlord of the above inn. It appeared that the child’s clothes accidentally caught fire on Sunday morning, and it was so dreadfully burnt as to cause death. Verdict— Accidental death.
Launceston Advertiser, 30 May 1839

Cornwall Chronicle, 15 June 1839
Cornwall Chronicle, 15 June 1839

Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1839
Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1839

Cornwall Chronicle, 8 February 1840
Cornwall Chronicle, 8 February 1840

Cornwall Chronicle, 14 November 1840
Cornwall Chronicle, 14 November 1840

Launceston Advertiser, 24 December 1840
Launceston Advertiser, 24 December 1840

1Launceston Courier, 5 September 1842
Launceston Courier, 5 September 1842

Albert Harmon Bays was then placed at the bar. charged with feloniously receiving, on the 20th of November, nine bagatelle balls, the property of Mr. Charles Grant, well knowing the same to have been stolen.

Mr. Charles Grant examined by Mr. Kennedy.— I am a publican, and keep the Plough Inn in Launceston ; on the 9th November I had nine bagatelle halls, but missed them on that day ; I saw them about a couple of hours before missing them; the next time I saw them was in possession of Constable Davis, two months afterwards; I had had the balls for two years, and lost them all at one time ; they were not all of the same size, one was less than the others, I should know one of them again; the small ball was white, one of the other eight balls was red; when I saw the balls with Constable Davis the red ball was turned into a white one, but I recognised it not withstanding; the seven balls produced I believe to be mine, I am positive about the other two; they are worth five shillings each ; I know one ball by a hole which was there when I bought it.

By the Court.- saw the balls on the same day I missed them : I can swear to the ball with the plug in it.
[continued]
Launceston Advertiser, 3 January 1845

Launceston Advertiser, 4 September 1845
Launceston Advertiser, 4 September 1845

Cornwall Chronicle, 21 January 1846b
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 January 1846

Cornwall Chronicle, 21 January 1846
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 January 1846

Launceston Advertiser, 5 February 1846
Launceston Advertiser, 5 February 1846

WEDNESDAY.
Isaac Harris, fish-dealer appeared to answer an information of Mr. D. C. Davis, for using violent and obscene language to Mr Mills of the “Plough Inn,” Charles-street. From Mr. Mills’s statement, Harris came to his own house on Saturday last and because he would not allow him to go into his parlour to hawk his fish, abused him, and made use of the most brutal language, thereby causing such a commotion about the house, as to prevent him carrying on his business ; the magistrate told hire his conduct was must unwarrantable, but he could only fine him fire shillings, which however, with the costs of the information would amount to seventeen shillings

Cornwall Chronicle, 25 April 1846

Launceston Examiner, 25 December 1847
Launceston Examiner, 25 December 1847

ALARMING FIRE.
Last night, about eight o’clock, the premises of Messrs. Aaron and Saul Solomon, known as the “Red House,” in Charles-street, and formerly occupied by Messrs. Moss and Nathan were discovered to be on fire, and scarcely had the alarm been given, ‘ere the whole of the building was enveloped in flames. The adjoining houses speedily caught fire, and by ten o’clock, the range of buildings between Mr. Lassetter’s Auction Mart, and the premises of Mr. Webster, the ironmonger was entirely destroyed. Mr. Higgs, the pastry-cook, Mr. Sykes, the tobacconist — the house lately occupied by Mr. Bertram Nathan, and a Baker’s on the south side of the Red House, together with numerous outbuildings in the rear, were burnt out. The fire is said to have originated in the carelessness of a lad who was in Messrs. Solomon’s shop, and it was with some difficulty that the children of Mrs. Solomon, and Mrs. Higgs, were rescued from destruction.

The fire had been raging nearly three quarters of an hour before the engines made their appearance and when at length that belonging to the Cornwall Insurance arrived there was scarcely any water on the spot for its use. The engines of the Tasmanian, Derwent and Tamar, and a smaller one belonging to the garrison, succeeded, and as soon as possible began to play upon the adjoining property of Mr. Webster and Mr. Lassetter, to save which now became the principal object. Several detachments of the Military were brought up in double quick time, and a number of the men were set to work to pull down the wooden buildings in the rear, so as to prevent the flames from communicating with the houses in York and Elizabeth-streets, which at one time were considered in danger.

The evening was calm, but had the wind blown from the south or east, the destruction of property would have been much more serious. The spacious premises of Messrs. Moss & Nathan at the corner of Charles and York-streets including the lofty store lately erected by those gentlemen, and the adjoining houses, as also the Plough Inn, and Mr. Lassetter’s Auction Mart, were at one time thought to be doomed. Mr, Brooks’ shop at the corner of Elizabeth and Charles-streets, and all the buildings down in the direction of Wellington-street, were far from being secure.
[continued]
Cornwall Chronicle, 19 October 1848

THE LATE FIRE IN CHARLES-STREET.
Coroner’s inquiry into the cause of the fire.
At the suggestion of several influential inhabitants, and with a view to satisfy the public mind on the circumstances of the late fire, a jury of twelve was directed by William Tarleton, Esq., Coroner, to be summoned at the house of Mr. James Hann, Plough Inn, Charles-street, on Friday afternoon, at three o’clock.
[continued]
Cornwall Chronicle, 25 October 1848

Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1848
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1848

Extract from “Annual Licensing Day”
There were ten applications for new licenses. Of these, two were for previously licensed houses, and another was for a person who had held a license, and it was put to the meeting whether all these should be placed on the same footing, when it was decided that the two previously licensed houses should have the preference. The applications were then read; one from John M’Kenzie for the “Farmers’ Arms,” lately kept by Mr. Mason ; the other from Thomas Lawson, jun., for the “Plough Inn,” Charles-street, which latter was granted. The remaining nine stood over for consideration on the adjourned licensing day.
Launceston Examiner, 5 September 1849

Launceston Examiner, 19 September 1849
Launceston Examiner, 19 September 1849

Launceston Examiner, 1 December 1849
Launceston Examiner, 1 December 1849

Launceston Examiner, 26 March 1851
Launceston Examiner, 26 March 1851

Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1853
Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1853

Launceston Examiner, 22 December 1853
Launceston Examiner, 22 December 1853

Hobarton Guardian, 9 November 1853
Hobarton Guardian, 9 November 1853

Hobarton Mercury, 12 January 1855
Hobarton Mercury, 12 January 1855

Examiner, 24 April 1855
Examiner, 24 April 1855

Cornwall Chronicle, 12 January 1856
Cornwall Chronicle, 12 January 1856

Cornwall Chronicle, 30 April 1856
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 April 1856

Cornwall Chronicle, 21 May 1856
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 May 1856

Cornwall Chronicle, 21 May 1857
Cornwall Chronicle, 21 May 1857

Examiner, 23 July 1857
Examiner, 23 July 1857

Cornwall Chronicle, 5 August 1857
Cornwall Chronicle, 5 August 1857

Cornwall Chronicle, 9 September 1857
Cornwall Chronicle, 9 September 1857

Cornwall Chronicle, 4 January 1860
Cornwall Chronicle, 4 January 1860

Cornwall Chronicle, 25 January 1860
Cornwall Chronicle, 25 January 1860

Cornwall Chronicle, 27 October 1860
Cornwall Chronicle, 27 October 1860

TRANSFER DAY
The usual meeting for the transfer of Publican’s licenses was held at the Court House on Monday morning last.
J. Whiteford, Esq, Chairman of the Quarter Sessions, presided as Chairman. The on– other parties were W. Gunn, Esq, Police Magistrate, and his Worship, the Mayor.
The first application made was from John Sullivan, late of the Fire Brigade Hotel, Brisbane-street, to William Burston.
His Worship the Mayor, urged a “—– objection” to this transfer, inasmuch as he thought Mr Sullivan had been trafficking in public house licenses.
Mr Sullivan.–If then, Sir, I have been doing as you represent, it has been an unfortunate “traffic’ for me, as I have nearly emptied my pocket by so doing.
His Worship remarked that he had nothing to say against Mr Sullivan’s character. He had simple made the foregoing observation — the discharge of his public duty.
The Police Magistrate approved of the transfer of the licenses, and thought Mr Sullivan highly competent to conduct such an establishment as the Plough Inn, which had induced him retire from the Fire Brigade Hotel.
Transfer granted.
Cornwall Chronicle, 3 November 1860

Cornwall Chronicle, 10 November 1860
Cornwall Chronicle, 10 November 1860

Cornwall Chronicle, 6 July 1862
Cornwall Chronicle, 6 July 1862

Annual Licensing Day, Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862
Annual Licensing Day, Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862

Cornwall Chronicle, 22 August 1863
Cornwall Chronicle, 22 August 1863

Breach of Licensed Victuallers’ Act.
Daniel Lawson, landlord of the Plough Inn, was fined 10s. with 7s. 6d. costs, for not having the lamp at his licensed house lighted on the night of the 21st instant.
Cornwall Chronicle, 29 August 1863

Cornwall Chronicle, 3 August 1864
Cornwall Chronicle, 3 August 1864

Launceston Examiner, 25 May 1865
Launceston Examiner, 25 May 1865

Mr Douglas said, with reference to the Plough Inn, the occupier was obliged to close it as its new proprietor, Mr Hart, required it for his own business, and it was the same with regard to the Angel Inn.
Cornwall Chronicle, 6 May 1868

Cornwall Chronicle, 19 October 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 19 October 1867

The Annual Licensing Meetings will be held on Monday next. Amongst the application is one from Alfred Stephen Harris for a license to the house at the corner of Bathurst and York-streets, formerly “Lamb and Flag.” Mr Hely intends to alter the designation of “The Ship Inn,” Wharf, to that of “The Duke of Edinburgh,” and Mr Walter Harris intends to alter the title of his new premises at the corner of Charles and Patterson-streets from “The Turf Hotel” to “The Plough Inn.”
Cornwall Chronicle, 30 November 1867

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