Lord Raglan

Bathurst & Wellington St.
Appears to have been at the southern end of Bathurst St, one or two buildings from the corner of Frankland St, on the western side. Google Maps, approximate location

1859-63 Edward Fiddyment, Lord Raglan, Wellington and Bathurst-streets

Edward Fiddyment, from Duke of York, Wellington-street, to premises on the opposite side of the street, to be called the Lord Raglan. Mr. Rocher and Mr. A. Douglas appeared to support the application.
Major Welman stated his opinion in favor of the application on the ground that Mr. Fiddyment was a respectable man and that the house occupied by him at present is in a very dilapidated state, where as the one to which it was intended to transfer the license was a new one.
The Chairman questioned whether they had the power to transfer a license from one premises to other.
Mr. Rocher quoted the section of the Act referring to granting of transfers, and submitted that it was at the discretion of the meeting whether they granted a transfer from one house to another.
Mr. Douglas said that if the house was in such a dilapidated state the Justices would in a manner impose a penalty upon the applicant in refusing to grant the transfer and thereby compelling him to get a new licence; he considered that as the laws in this colony were getting more liberal than they were some years ago the section of the act should have a liberal construction put upon it; and in the applicants case nobody could possibly be a sufferer by the transfer but some would be gainers.
The Chairman observed that the application was made out in the form for a license, not for a transfer; and taking the application to be for a new license it was a question whether they could grant a licence to one already holding a licence. After a little further discussion Mr. Douglas said the application should be taken as an original licence and the applicant could then petition the treasury for a remission of the licence fee. A licence was then granted on the understanding that Mr. Fiddyment closes the premises now occupied by him on his removal to the opposite premises.
Launceston Examiner, 8 February 1859

CAUTION TO THE PUBLIC.
A dreadful row occurred at Fiddyment’s, “Lord Raglan,”on Thursday afternoon, the 26th instant!
Two carters had a quarrel, and went into a paddock on the Cataract Hill-had three rounds in an English manner, then shook hands and made friends. At the time every. thing was quiet, Mr. Sergeant Peters came up and told me that I kept a disorderly house, saying-“Talk about the Cross Keys-this a house is ten times worse.” Now, Mr. Editor, I have been in business these twelve years in h Launceston, since I purchased my discharge from the 96th Regiment, and I think my a character will bear investigation; and perhaps, Mr. Editor, Sergeant. Peters will inform us what brought him in Victoria-street, at the back of my house, on Sunday morning last, a dressed in private clothes, and another gentle man with him, who is living in a house occupied by a person who owes me twenty-five shillings for rent.
Mr. Editor, I have always appreciated the conduct of Mr. Peters, even when he was stationed on the Sand Hill. He puts me in mind a of a gentleman who used to sit on the fence opposite Mr. John Carter’s, to prevent the waggoners and people going into the: house, and as I do not wish to have the same game carried on with me I make these matters public. Query ? Sure it couldn’t be the fire bell was looking after, which has lately escaped from the watch-house up to the Sand Hill ? Should he require to have a ring at it in case I of danger, he can be obliged on application. Sir. Editor, I contribute towards the police–including the house I live in and other property–the amount of nearly 100l per year, and I do not see that I should be humbugged by Mr. Sergeant Peters.
Begging you will be so kind as to insert this in your very valuable journal, you will greatly oblige

Sir, your most obedient servant,
EDWARD FIDDYMENT
May 27.
Launceston Examiner 2 June 1859

Launceston Examiner, 28 July 1859
Launceston Examiner, 28 July 1859

Launceston Examiner, 17 September 1859
Launceston Examiner, 17 September 1859

Launceston Examiner, 22 March 1860
Launceston Examiner, 22 March 1860

From Annual Licensing Day:
Edward Fiddyment, Lord Raglan Inn, Wellington and Bathurst-streets.
Mr. Gunn said that Fiddyment was not a competent person, but his wife was a very good manager. Mr. Douglas appeared in support of the application, and said that the fact was that Fiddyment’s intellect had only been temporarily impaired by temporary difficulties, which had now ended in the Insolvent Court, and It would probably soon recover. Granted.
Launceston Examiner, 10 December 1861

Cornwall Volunteer Fire Brigade
Launceston Examiner, 28 November 1861
Launceston Examiner, 28 November 1861

Launceston Examiner, 16 August 1862
Launceston Examiner, 16 August 1862

Extract from a letter to the editor:
You should remember that Mr. Sherwin was once so eager in the cause of teetotalism, that he actually purchased (at a low figure) a public house to take it out of the nefarious traffic, and made it his private residence, and although he sold it again (at a high price) and assisted at the licensing meeting in getting a license to it under the title of the “Lord Raglan,” transferred from an old licensed house opposite — to the utter ruin of the latter property, which had been left in trust for a number of orphan children, of course he did all these things from proper motives, and not without due consideration.
Cornwall Chronicle, 8 November 1862

Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862
Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1862

Launceston Examiner, 22 March 1864
Launceston Examiner, 22 March 1864

Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867
Cornwall Chronicle, 4 December 1867

Cornwall Chronicle, 3 February 1869
Cornwall Chronicle, 3 February 1869

Cornwall Chronicle, 11 September 1869
Cornwall Chronicle, 11 September 1869

Launceston Examiner, 16 March 1871
Launceston Examiner, 16 March 1871

Launceston Examiner, 6 April 1872
Launceston Examiner, 6 April 1872

Launceston Examiner, 4 March 1881
Launceston Examiner, 4 March 1881

We understand that the valuable premises known as the Volunteer Hotel, at the corner of Brisbane and George streets, has again changed hands. It was purchased by Mr T. Barrett in the beginning of July for £2600, including goodwill and furniture, and the hotel has now been sold privately to Mr R. Edwards, of the Commercial Hotel, for £3500. We also understand that Mr Barrett has purchased for £900 the property known as the old Lord Raglan,at the Corner of Wellingto nand Frankland streets.
The Tasmanian, 1 October 1881

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