Kangaroo–Prince of Wales–Dolphin Inn–Courthouse Hotel

SE cnr Paterson & Wellington Streets. Google Maps.

Img_2369

Photo, 1940s

Previously in Wellington Street
1842 John Hinshaw, Kangaroo, Paterson & Wellington Streets
1843-45 John Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, Paterson & Wellington Streets
1846 John Hinshaw, Prince of Wales, York & Wellington Streets –> continued under Prince of Wales
1846-54 William Brigg, Dolphin, Wellington & Paterson Streets –> previously in Wellington Street
1855-59 Thomas Butterworth, Dolphin Inn, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1859 Mary Butterworth, Dolphin Inn, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1860-80 Mary Butterworth, Courthouse Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1880-84 David Powell, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1885 Joseph Stanley, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1886 Richard Symmons,Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1887 Robert Barrett Armstrong, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1890-91 Michael Donald, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1892 James Irvine, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1893 John Thompson, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1894 Elizabeth Wilson, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1894 Rebecca Davis, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets
1895+ Frances Mary Powell, Court House Hotel, Patterson & Wellington Streets

Launceston Advertiser, 28 April 1842
Launceston Advertiser, 28 April 1842
Launceston Courier, 5 September 1842
Launceston Courier, 5 September 1842

Cornwall Chronicle, 6 March 1844
Cornwall Chronicle, 6 March 1844

Cornwall Chronicle, 18 April 1846
Cornwall Chronicle, 18 April 1846

Photos from 2016:Mw1_0723

Cornwall Chronicle, 29 July 1846
Cornwall Chronicle, 29 July 1846

William Brings, White Horse [wrong name], Wellington and Patterson, streets— Suspected of Sunday trading and rooms unfurnished.
Mr. Gunn. — All houses, not properly furnished, but merely used for the sale of drink, ought to be immediately crushed.
Major Wellman.- The reason the house is not furnished is because Mr. Briggs has been unfortunate and we do not know how soon that may be the case with any one of us.
Captain Gardiner objected to any such observations being made by a magistrate, they tended to degrade the body which was met for a specific purpose.
Mr. Collett understood that there were also strong suspicions of Sunday trading against Mr. Briggs.
Mr. Wales, suspicion only will not do-—rumour is a very bad foundation to rely on, especially when it operates against a man so as to deprive him of a livelihood.
Mr. Tarleton wished the application to be postponed until the next quarterly meeting, to allow Mr. Briggs to furnish his house for the accommodation of the public.
Mr. Robertson— If you prevent Mr. Briggs carrying on his trade for the next three months, it is not unlikely you may ruin him altogether.
Mr. Sams spoke most feelingly in favor of Mr. Briggs pointing out the heavy rent he was under, his large family, his most respectable character—-that he had come from a small house to a large one, and being only five weeks in the house he had not had time to provide furniture for all the rooms, which were very extensive.
Mr. Moore, if an objection is to be made, it must be either against the individual or the premises—-there is not one word in the Act of Council about furniture– let us therefore take a favorable view of Mr. Brigg’s position.
Mr. James Lilly here stepped forward from among the by-standers, and said Gentlemen, if you will grant Mr. Briggs his license, I will, within a week, put One Hundred Pounds worth of furniture in his house. (Loud cheering and cries of hear, hear–Order, order.) License granted on Mr. Lilly’s undertaking.
Cornwall Chronicle, 2 September 1846

Launceston Examiner, 13 January 1847
Launceston Examiner, 13 January 1847

Launceston Examiner, 4 September 1847
“Launceston Examiner, 4 September 1847

Launceston Examiner, 2 September 1848
Launceston Examiner, 2 September 1848

Launceston Examiner, 29 March 1851
Launceston Examiner, 29 March 1851

DINNER TO RICHARD DRY, ESQ.
On Friday .evening last, ‘a public dinner was given at the Dolphin Inn, to the newly elected Member for Launceston, R. Dry, Esq. A very large number of persons were present, about one hundred and forty, and many were excluded from want of room. The viands, which were all cold, were excellent and abundant, and the arrangements were in every respect such as reflected credit upon the landlord. Behind the chair was a large blue silk banner, upon which were inscribed the words–“Floreat. Richard Dry, the Native Patriot : Tasmania,” On the right of the chairman hung the Union Jack, and the graceful banner of the League was on its left. James Robertson, Esq., officiated as chairman, whilst A. J. Marriott, C. J. Weedon, and Frederick A. Du Croz, Esquires, officiated as vice-chairmen. Shortly after seven o’clock, Richard Dry, Esq., entered the room, and was received with enthusiastic cheering. Mr. Dry took his seat on the right hand of the chairman, whilst the latter was supported on his left by J. W. Gleadow, Esq., the member for the county of Cornwall.

Anticipating, from the excitement which prevailed in the town, that interruption would be offered to the proceedings, Mr. Brigg had prudently boarded up some of the upper storey windows; but those below were unsecured. Just as dinner was concluded, ‘and preparations were being made to Introduce the toasts, A. J. Marriott, Esq., rose and said he had been informed that a mob had been breaking the windows of Mr. Fuller, and were then coming uip the street to serve Mr. Brigg’s windows in a similar way: should such be the case, Mr. Marriott ventured to assert that the meeting would be prepared to receive them. A land cheer was the confirmatory response, which was instantly followed by discharge of stones from without. Most of the lower windows were broken, and a few large stones struck the boards which bad been nailed up outside the upper windows, and fell harmlessly to the ground. In a few moments seventy or eighty of the company seized their sticks and sallied out upon the assailants, but the cowards, after discharging their missiles had taken to their heels.
[continued]
Launceston Examiner, 29 October 1851

Cornwall Chronicle, 18 August 1855
Cornwall Chronicle, 18 August 1855

Mw1_0724

Launceston Examiner, 4 December 1855
Launceston Examiner, 4 December 1855

Launceston Examiner, 25 December 1855
Launceston Examiner, 25 December 1855

MORE BEACHES OF THE SUNDAY CLAUSE–On Tuesday, District Constable Scott proceeded against Thomas Butterworth, of the “Dolphin Inn,” and Robert West, of the “Commercial Inn,” for having persons in their licensed houses on Sunday. The former was fined £2 and costs, and the latter £5 and costs. It was stated that n West, who did not appear, was drunk,I and he will be proceeded against accordingly.
Launceston Examiner, 29 May 1856

Cornwall Chronicle, 23 May 1857
Cornwall Chronicle, 23 May 1857

LARCENY-James Smith was charged with stealing one bottle of gin, the property of Thomas Butterworth, Dolphin Inn, Patterson-street. The charge being folly proved, the prisoner was sentenced to six months hard labour.
Launceston Examiner, 14 October 1858

Launceston Examiner, 8 January 1859
Launceston Examiner, 8 January 1859

Mw1_0730

Launceston Examiner, 8 February 1859
Launceston Examiner, 8 February 1859

Cornwall Chronicle, 16 July 1859
Cornwall Chronicle, 16 July 1859

Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1859
Cornwall Chronicle, 7 September 1859

From “Police Office”:
Stealing a Musical Box
William Knowles was sentenced to six months’ hard labor for stealing a musical box, the property of Mrs Butterworth, from the bar of the Dolphin Inn. Mrs Butterworth’s son saw Knowles making off with the box ; he gave chase and overtook Knowles near the Cross Keys and gave him into the custody of Countable Hogan.
Cornwall Chronicle, 19 September 1860

Launceston Examiner, 20 October 1860
Launceston Examiner, 20 October 1860

Cornwall Chronicle, 1 May 1861
Cornwall Chronicle, 1 May 1861

Cornwall Chronicle, 13 September 1862
Cornwall Chronicle, 13 September 1862

Cornwall Chronicle, 8 December 1869
Cornwall Chronicle, 8 December 1869

Launceston Examiner, 23 March 1876
Launceston Examiner, 23 March 1876

Launceston Examiner, 28 November 1878
Launceston Examiner, 28 November 1878

Launceston Examiner, 24 August 1880
Launceston Examiner, 24 August 1880

Mw1_0728

Launceston Examiner, 1 November 1880
Launceston Examiner, 1 November 1880

From “Annual Licensing Meeting”:
Court House Hotel, Wellington and Patterson streets.
David Powell, applicant.
The Mayor pointed out that in this house was a large room which had been subdivided into a
number of bedrooms. These were not properly ventilated or lighted.
Mr J. Powell undertook on behalf of the applicant that the matter would be attended to, and the application was granted.

Launceston Examiner, 2 December 1880

Launceston Examiner, 18 January 1881
Launceston Examiner, 18 January 1881

From “Launceston Police Court”:
A Similar Case— Mary. Rhodes, charged John Hill and Sarah Sullivan with having assaulted her on the 23rd inst. Hill pleaded, not guilty, and Sullivan guilty. Complainant deposed that she was at the Court House Hotel on the date named when defendant Hill assaulted her. Sullivan also striking her in the face. Jas. Tregea, barman of the Court House Hotel was called for the prosecution, but knew nothing of the case. George Chalker said he saw complainant and defendant in the Court House Hotel on the 23rd inst ; saw defendant Sullivan strike complainant, and then the lights were put out. Sullivan was fined 10s with costs, and the case against Hill was discharged.
The Tasmanian, 8 April 1882

No less than six abortive attempts have been made to erect a theatre in Launceston. The matter appears at last to have been taken up with spirit. It has been already announced that Messrs. J. L. Hall and Allan Hamilton have a project on the tapis for erecting a theatre in George-street, near Brisbane-street ; and now Mr. David Powell, of the Court-house Hotel, has made arrangements to build a place of amusement suitable to the requirements of the town on a large allotment of land at the angle of Patterson and Wellington streets. Its cost, exclusive of the land, will be between £5,000 and £6,000 ; and the owner says he does not intend to let a hundred pounds or so stand in the way of carrying his object to a successful issue. The theatre, as proposed, will have a depth of 134ft., and a width of 70ft., the stage will be 40ft. deep, and 31ft. in width from the proscenium corners, and of course the width of the building right across. It is to be fitted with dress circle, pit and stalls, and the internal decorations are to be on a scale which will make it one of the handsomest and most comfortable theatres in the colonies. To Mr. J. S. Smith, the popular entrepreneur, is entrusted the interior arrangements of the building, and that alone is a criterion that all will be carried out thoroughly. Mr. H. Evans, who is no novice at theatrical work, is the architect, and his plans will be in readiness to-day, and tenders will be called forthwith. To show that business is meant in the present venture, I may mention that Mr. J, S. Smith has already taken the theatre for 12 months, and Mr. Pollard has secured it for a similar period to follow. It is to be hoped that between two stools the public will not again come to the ground in the matter of obtaining a much needed place of entertainment.
The Mercury, 15 October 1884

Photos from 2005:
Dscf5530

Daily Telegraph, 25 June 1885
Daily Telegraph, 25 June 1885

From “Licensing Meeting”:
Joseph Stanley, from David Powell, Court House Hotel, Wellington and Patterson streets.
Mr. Murray said this case had come before the Police Court as an application to sell, but he had refused to have anything to do with the transfer, because there was a brothel, he did not say in connection with the hotel, but at all events leased by the same parties. He found that when the transfer was applied for the cottage in question was still a brothel, and he thought It very discreditable and highly undesirable that brothels should exist in connection with public-houses.
Mr. Coulter said Mr. Stanley had nothing whatever to do with the cottage in question; it did not form part of his lease in any way.
Mr. Collins, who appeared for the applicant, said that there was no communication what ever between the cottage and the public-house. Mr. Powell, the owner of the hotel, had obtained a lease of the cottage in question for the very purpose of getting rid of the bad characters who had previously occupied it.
The Mayor said it seemed strange that Mr. Powell, who had leased the cottage for the expressed purpose of ridding it of objectionable characters, should have again let it to similar persons.
Mr. Stanley said Mr. Powell had let the house to a respectable tenant, who had sublet it; but he (the applicant) had nothing to do with the brothel, which was not connected in any way with the hotel.
The Mayor said the applicant could not of course be held responsible for the conduct of a house which did not belong to him in any way, but it would be well for him to note what the feeling of the Bench was on the matter.
The application was then granted.
Launceston Examiner, 4 August 1885

Launceston Examiner, 30 January 1886
Launceston Examiner, 30 January 1886

Dscf5531

Launceston Examiner, 2 June 1886
Launceston Examiner, 2 June 1886

Daily Telegraph, 27 July 1887
Daily Telegraph, 27 July 1887

Daily Telegraph, 26 October 1887
Daily Telegraph, 26 October 1887

The Colonist, 25 January 1890
The Colonist, 25 January 1890

Daily Telegraph, 10 March 1890
Daily Telegraph, 10 March 1890

Launceston Examiner, 5 August 1890
Launceston Examiner, 5 August 1890

Launceston Examiner, 11 October 1890
Launceston Examiner, 11 October 1890

Tasmanian,10 September 1892
Tasmanian,10 September 1892

Launceston Examiner, 15 October 1892
Launceston Examiner, 15 October 1892

Tasmanian, 29 October 1892
Tasmanian, 29 October 1892

PERMISSION was granted to John Thompson at the police court on Saturday to sell liquors at the Court House Hotel under the license held by James Irvine.
Launceston Examiner, 8 May 1893

Launceston Examiner, 8 May 1893
Launceston Examiner, 8 May 1893

INTERIM LICENSE.
Rebecca Davis was granted permission to sell liquors at the Court House Hotel under the license held by Elizabeth Wilson until the next quarterly meeting of the Licensing Bench.

Launceston Examiner, 30 October 1894

Daily Telegraph, 9 July 1895
Daily Telegraph, 9 July 1895

In considering the application for the transfer of the Court House Hotel, from Rebecca Davies to Frances Mary Powell, and a similar transfer in the Selby district, of the Rising Sun Hotel to Elizabeth J. Powell, Mr Barnes suggested the question whether it was desirable to grant licenses to young unmarried females. He had no personal objections to the individuals themselves in these instances, but as a principle he thought it open to objection. Mr Superintendent Coulter did not see they could well be debarred from licenses, especially as these were times when they were extending woman’s franchise and other privileges to the sex. Mr Carter, chairman, said there was nothing in the Act to hinder licenses being granted to single females if they were suitable applicants in other respects. After a little farther discussion the applications were granted.
Daily Telegraph, 6 August 1895

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*