Rose & Thistle

Charles St
NE cnr Brisbane & George Streets

1824-26 Mr Alex Stewart, Rose and Thistle
1827-31 Alexander Stewart, Rose and Thistle, Charles Street
1834 Alexander Stewart, Rose and Thistle
1835 Andrew Dinell, Rose and Thistle
1836 John Moore
1836-37 George Fenton, Brisbane & George St

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George St, with Brisbane St corner, 2016.

The Brisbane and George St location was later the Horse and Groom, then Verandah Wine Vaults for a short time, then Union Inn

On Wednesday last our worthy Magistrates, Messrs. Kenworthy, Gordon, and Simpson, went round to inspect the various public houses, and also those houses for which applications had been made to be allowed to retail spirituous liquors. At Alexander Stewart’s they found only one bed, that in which he and his wife sleep, the house is an old one, with two small front rooms, and one back room, there was not one single chair, and scarcely a table in this house, yet it was relicensed but he bows very obsequiously.
Launceston Advertiser, 28 September 1829

LA 24 November 1836
Launceston Advertiser, 24 November 1836

LA 2 November 1837
Launceston Advertiser, 2 November 1837

Jolly Sailor

1823 Thomas Manning licensed to sell Beer only
1826 Thomas Manning, Jolly Sailor, Launceston
1827 Thomas Manning, Jolly Sailor, Brisbane-st

On Wednesday last our worthy Magistrates, Messrs. Kenworthy, Gordon, and Simpson, went round to inspect the various public houses, and also those houses for which applications had been made to be allowed to retail spirituous liquors. At Alexander Stewart’s they found only one bed, that in which he and his wife sleep, the house is an old one, with two small front rooms, and one back room, there was not one single chair, and scarcely a table in this house, yet it was relicensed but he bows very obsequiously. They also visited a house formerly kept by Mr. Thomas Manning, which house was refused a license last year, and Mr. T. C. Simpson was on the bench. This house has had no additional accommodation added to it, and yet a license was granted to it, it is an old house, contains three very small front rooms, and a back skilling, and was pronounced by P. A. Mulgrave, Esq. and Mr. Simpson a year back as not possessing sufficient accommodations.
Launceston Advertiser, 28 September 1829

Black Swan

SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. Google Maps, approximate location.
Demolished 1894

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SE cnr Brisbane & Wellington Streets. (2015)

1826 George Burgess, Black Swan, Launceston
1827 George Burgess, Black Swan, Launceston
?-1831 Thomas Caryl, Black Swan (College Arms?), Launceston*
1831-33 Neil Campbell, Black Swan, Brisbane Street
1834 Adam Moore
1835-37 George Archer, Black Swan
1838 William Mason, Black Swan
1839 Thomas Dudley, Black Swan Wine Vaults, Brisbane & Wellington Streets
1840-42 Thomas Dudley, Black Swan, Wellington St/Brisbane St
1843-45 James Childs, Black Swan, Brisbane and Wellington streets
1846 License refused
Became Wilmot Arms

*1830 Thomas Caryl is listed as being granted a licence for the College Arms.

Photo of Wellington St, with Brisbane St intersection on the very right. The light coloured building on that corner is the Wilmot Arms (name is along the top), which is a facade around the older Black Swan. (Alternate link.)

From a lecture by Mr E. Whitfield. 1897:
In 1820 came the first public house, “The Black Swan,” kept by G. Burgess, corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets. Then came in 1823 the Launceston, the Plough Inn, kept by W. Field, where Hart and Sons are now, and the Hope and Anchor, kept by Nat. Lucas. The Launceston Hotel ,was built by Richard White, familiarly known as “Dicky White.”
Launceston Examiner, 6 February 1897

Extracts from Examiner story, “Colourful Old Hostelries”:
The first hotel in Launceston was the Black Swan, built in 1820, and kept by G. Burgess, an old whaler. It stood on the corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets and was after wards known as the Wilmot Arms before it was pulled down.

In Brisbane St. where the Enfleld (now McClymont’s), Cleary’s (now Tuck’s shop), Wilmot Arms (now a motor garage), Noah’s Ark (at corner of Margaret St.), Glenfield House, Barber’s Hotel (now Routley’s and the adjoining bank) and the Fire Brigade (now the Imperial).
Examiner, 12 March 1946

Colonial Times, 13 July 1827
Colonial Times, 13 July 1827
Continue reading Black Swan

Fire Brigade Hotel


1880 Michael Lawler, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane Street
1887 Edward Bonser, Wilmot Arms, Brisbane Street
1887 Edward Bonser, Fire Brigade Hotel, Brisbane Street

170 Brisbane St. Google Maps.
Later Druids, Imperial, Billabong, Galaxy, Plough Inn

Photo, as Billabong Hotel, 1992

Cornwall Chronicle, 19 May 1860
Cornwall Chronicle, 19 May 1860
Continue reading Fire Brigade Hotel

Plough Inn (1)

There were at least three buildings licensed as the Plough Inn. William Field, one of the first hoteliers in Launceston, had a Plough Inn in Brisbane St in the 1820s. After that, until 1864, the Plough Inn was in Charles St, where it was the terminus for coaching services. After the Plough ceased operating, the name was transferred to the Turf Hotel, on the corner of Patterson & Charles St, which at the time was in the hands of Walter Harris, a previous licensee of the Charles & York property.

1823 William Field
1824 William Field, Plough
1826 William Field, Plough
1827 William Field, Plough, Brisbane St
1829 William Field, Plough, Brisbane St

During 1823 and 1824 licenses were granted to W. Field and Nat Lucas, the former being host of the Plough Inn, and; the latter of the Hope and Anchor. The original Plough Inn occupied by W. Field, was at the corner of York and Charles streets, and was subsequently re-named the Bull’s Head. At that time (1823) the Hobart Town-road used to wind out of Brisbane-Street, where is now Roles and Jones’s establishment, through Howe and Wiggins’s to the corner of Wellington and Elizabeth streets. The Plough Inn that stood on a site now included in the establishment of Messrs. W. Hart and son was built by Richard Lawson, a district constable.
The Tasmanian, 2 February 1889

From a lecture by Mr E. Whitfield. 1897:
In 1820 came the first public house, “The Black Swan,” kept by G. Burgess, corner of Brisbane and Wellington streets. Then came in 1823 the Launceston, the Plough Inn, kept by W. Field, where Hart and Sons are now, and the Hope and Anchor, kept by Nat. Lucas. The Launceston Hotel, was built by Richard White, familiarly known as “Dicky White.”
Launceston Examiner, 6 February 1897

York & Charles Street and “where Hart and Sons are now” are the location of the second establishment to use the name Plough Inn.

Launceston Advertiser, 21 December 1829
Launceston Advertiser, 21 December 1829

Launceston Advertiser, 28 December 1829
Launceston Advertiser, 28 December 1829

Red Lion

Brisbane Street.

Licensing Lists:
1824 Mr Henry Boyle, Red Lion
1826 Mr Henry Boyle, Red Lion
1827 Henry Boyle, Red Lion, Brisbane St

Mr. Henry Boyle, a publican in Launceston, was charged with an assault on the person of Thomas Walsh; which having been proved, he was bound over to keep the peace for 3 months.Tasmanian & Port Dalrymple Advertiser, 30 March 1825

Mary Boyle, the wife of Henry Boyle, who keeps the Lion Public house, Launceston, was charged with stealing, on the 8th of November, a fowl, of the value of 2s, the property of Peter Archer Mulgrave, the Police Magistrate. The ludicrous manner in which Antonio Fonsick, a Frenchman (Mr. Mulgrave’s cook) gave his evidence excited some laughter in the Court which could scarcely be restrained. Mr. Gellibrand defended the prisoner. Verdict- Not Guilty.
Hobart Town Gazette, 3 February 1827

A late night encounter:

The information and complaint of Henry Boyle of Launceston Publican who saith I keep the Red Lion public House in Launceston on the night of the twenty ninth of April last between seven and eight o clock I returned home the front window shutters and front door of my house were fastened the back Door was also fastened as well as the back windows which is in my bed Room. I knocked at it and said suppsing my wife was in bed mary I am come home there was a light in the Room my wife said I will get up I then went round to the front door and heard the back door opened I went round to it and shoved it open I saw no person in the passage or with a light I saw my wife by the fire light in the tap room she endeavoured to light a candle but could not I lighted the candle by the fire I said Mary I think there is somebody shuffling in that room pointing to the Room opposite the tap room let us go and look
[Continued]
(From “Manuscript 3251: Van Diemen’s Land 1821-1862, Original accounts from frontier Tasmania” )

King’s Head — Brisbane Hotel (2)

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Brisbane Street/The Avenue, now Old Brisbane Arcade. Google Maps.
First licensed 1835, as the King’s Head (although see below). Substantially remodelled 1888. Interior demolished 1960s and converted into arcade.

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1835-43 Joseph Barrett, King’s Head, Brisbane Street
1844-45 Thomas Huxley, King’s Head, Brisbane Street
?
1851-53 John Dowling, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street
1854 John Harwood, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street.
1855-56 John Harwood, Robin Hood, Brisbane Street
1857 John Dowling?
1858-85 Joseph Whyte Simmons, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street
1886 Edward Henry Panton, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street
1888-98 Auguste Deleuse, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street
1899+ Francois Marius Cognet, Brisbane Hotel, Brisbane Street

So far there is no continuity here from the King’s Head to the Brisbane Hotel, except through local/oral history (some of this is below). On a 1856 map, Barrett owned land in Brisbane St one block from the George Street intersection i.e. the location of the Brisbane Hotel, so it’s quite likely he had his hotel on land he owned. Prior to the King’s Head, Joseph Barrett is licensee for the Mermaid, also in Brisbane St. Was this on the same site?
Continue reading King’s Head — Brisbane Hotel (2)