Prime Minister’s Suite, Old Parliament House, Canberra

Main Post: Old Parliament House
The Prime Minister’s suite of rooms is situated in the northeast corner of Old Parliament House, an area that was occupied by the Prime Minister and his staff throughout the life span of the building.
. . .
The suite as it exists today was occupied by three Prime Ministers: Gough Whitlam (occupied it between 1972 to 1975), Malcolm Fraser (occupied it between 1975 to 1983) and Bob Hawke (occupied it between 1983 – 1988), and included offices (for the Prime Minister and his staff), an anteroom for press conferences (also used as a waiting room) and bathrooms.
. . .
Positions that worked in this suite included the principal private secretary, private secretaries, stenographers, senior advisors, advisors, ministerial officers, telephonists and secretarial staff. By the end of the 1980s more than 30 people, with others coming and going at busy times, filled every available corner of this maze of offices.

Museum of Australia Democracy

Photos are presented are in the order they were taken.

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Senate Opposition Party Room, Old Parliament House, Canberra

Main post: Old Parliament House, Canberra

The Senate Opposition Party Room was known as the Senate Club Room from the opening of Provisional Parliament House in 1927 to 1937. It was a place for Senators from all political parties to congregate in a relaxed atmosphere to converse, write letters, read, or to enjoy film nights. Use of the Senate Club Room was later restricted to opposition Senators, who had lost the use of their former party room after the 1929 election, since which time it has been known as the Senate Opposition Party Room.

The room featured comfortable club style lounges and easy chairs, tables, mail boxes, large glass-fronted bookcases and (a later addition) sound proof telephone boxes for Senators without their own office space.
Museum of Australia Democracy

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Cellar, Woolmers

At Woolmers Estate, near Longford. The steps down to the cellar are at the end there, on the other side of the railing.


At the top is an information panel that says:

CELLARS
Part of the original construction of the weatherboard homestead. The Cellar rooms are paved in sandstone flags and have a ceiling height of 2700mm (9 feet). Drainage pits in the floors of each room appear to maintain a steady level. Pin in room 4 remains constantly empty. Vaulted storage bins added in 1840s. Possibly to house the cider barrels.

Original entrance to the cellar was through a trap door from inside the house. Present entrance down timber topped brick steps install in the 1840s.


Look up


Through first doorway.


Through second doorway.


Now heading back


Back through here


And there's another room to the side

And out!

Tram

Larger version.

Restored tram, belonging to Hobart City Council.


First paragraph:
TRAM NO. 39
Built in 1917 as a two-man tram.
No. 39 was originally operated by both a driver and a conductor. In 1926 it was converted to a one-man tram on which the driver was also required to collect the fares. After about 1946, when No. 39 was taken out of service, it served for a number of years as the meal room at the Moonah tram depot. It 1949 a former tramways inspector purchased No. 39 for £10 and kept it in his backyard in New Town for almost 40 years.

Lower deck, P.S. Gem

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Lower deck on P.S. Gem, at the Swan River Pioneer Settlement.

From information panel on post:

ENGINE ROOM
Following her conversion from barge to paddle steamer in 1877, this space would have been filled with the large, wood fired boiler which provided the steam for the engine. That was linked directly to the paddles through shafts either side. As can be seen in the photograph, the wood used as fuel took up a great deal of space here too. In 1891/92 that original engines was supplemented with a second set of pistons, increasing both power and efficiency.

To Middle Deck.

To Middle Deck

 

Upper Deck, P.S. Gem

Upper deck on P.S. Gem, at the Swan River Pioneer Settlement.

THE WHEELHOUSE

The nature of river travel on the ever changing Murray River required that the Captain have good visibility in order to guide his vessel through the pitfalls of snags, changing river levels and sand bars. From his perch high up in the wheelhouse the captain could pilot his boat secure in the knowledge that he had the best possible view--even if the foredeck was piled high with cargo. The broad decks fore and aft of the wheelhouse and accommodation on this level were also favourite spots for passengers. Overhead frames could be fitted with canvas shades on hot sunny days.

MURRAY RIVER CHART

The original Murray River charts were individually sketched by each captain based on his knowledge and experience in navigating the river. He would use India ink on cotton or linen materials and would map out features and topography for the appropriate length of the river. The map would then be rolled up like a scroll and unrolled as the boat progressed along different parts of the river. Survey bench marks, islands, snags and buildings would be added to the map by the Captain in order to assist in navigation. This section of a map shows part of the River Murray between Swan Hill and Boundary Bend; approximately 85 river miles (140 kilometres) downriver.

Down to Middle Deck

Down to Middle Deck.

Middle Deck, P.S. Gem

iddle deck on P.S. Gem, at the Swan River Pioneer Settlement.

From panel:
ART GALLERY
As part of the process of converting the PS Gem to an Art Gallery, all of the dividing bulkheads between the cabins along this row were removed. This gave a single large space which could be used for exhibitions. However, like the dividers in an egg box, the bulkheads also served a structural purpose and their removal meant that this deck of the vessel was largely open causing the vessel to change shape.

BATHROOMS
As "Queen of the Murray", the Gem was expected to provide a level of luxury beyond that of the "ordinary' boat. One of the elements of luxury which passengers could experience on the Gem was in the row of bathrooms and toilet facilities on either side of the main passenger deck.

Although the water wasn't plumbed, crew members would bring buckets of hot water up from the boiler room and passengers | could luxuriate in a hot bath.
It was, however, still the Murray River water and, given that the toilets simply emptied straight out into the river, as did every other paddle steamer using it, there was no guarantee of the water’s cleanliness.

To upper deck

Into Music Saloon

Into cabin

To Upper deck

To Lower deck

Charlie Napier Hotel, Sovereign Hill

This is one of two hotels in the main street of Sovereign Hill (open air museum & replica gold fields town). The other one, with less photos, is across the road.

Picture of original hotel.


Door to the right leads into the bar.


Two rooms off to the side. I presume they are parlours (one for men, one for women).


Two bedrooms upstairs, the first with one bed (one photo) and the other with four beds (two photos)


Also upstairs is a Masonic Hall.

Powder Magazine, Beechworth

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"Built in 1860 to store the gunpowder used in goldmining, the powder magazine was designed to minimise the risk of exploding. Only copper fittings were used, an elaborate lightning rod was fitted and people entering had to wear special shoes. Should an explosion have occurred, the design of the build would direct the blast safely upwards. The magazine was closed in 1918 and fell into decay. The roof was removed to stop vagrants sleeping there and it was almost demolished. The National Trust restored the building in 1966."

"Beechworth Powder Magazine was constructed in 1859 by T Dawson and Company. In 1857 the Victorian Government passed an act to regulate the importation, carriage and custody of black powder which led to the construction of several Powder Magazines throughout Victoria. According to the National Trust, the Beechworth Powder Magazine is the best example in Victoria of this particularly important building type.

The architecture of the building features a classical style in the tradition of the early colonial military buildings. It is constructed in local granite and includes sever safety precautions within the structure which directs a potential explosion upwards to minimise damage.

The Powder Magazine was no longer being used by the end of the 19th century and was officially closed in 1918 and abandoned. Neglected for many years, the building was left to decline until the 1960's when local interest was raised and a restoration process began. In 1965, the project was formally adopted by the National Trust and opened to public access."

l

"Windows."

Narryna, Battery Point, Hobart

This series of photos is from an "1830s merchant’s house" in Hobart. There is more information here, including a site plan and a visitor's guide (PDF) with a description of each of the rooms.

I have broken my photos up by room/part of the house, and linked them below.

1 Entrance Hall
2 Drawing Room
3 Dining Room
4 Guest Bedroom
5 Breakfast Room
6 Back Hall
7 Kitchen
8 Landing
Exhibition Rooms
10 Nursery
11 Bedroom
12 Hall & Dressing Room
13 Servants Quarters
14 Pantry
15 Laundry
Courtyard

Lyons Cottage

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Lyons Cottage, Stanley. Birthplace of former priminister Joseph Lyons "demonstrates the characteristics of a single storey, weatherboard Victorian Georgian dwelling" (from the link P&WS site). Constructed prior to 1870. More about the history of the house (and Lyons) in the P&WS site.


A guide to which rooms the photos are from. (Not to scale, obviously.)

Room 1: Bedroom


From bedroom into the hall.


Room 2: across hall from bedroom.


Hall, looking through the main living room (#3) to the kitchen (#5). The doorway to the left at the front is the bedroom (#1).


Entrance to main living room (#3), looking through to kitchen with door to 4 on the right.


Room 3: main living room


Room 4, set up as a study. I would think it'd be a second bedroom.


Room 5: kitchen


Kichen, with door to outside (#6)


Marked as #6 on plan.


The external walls are split timber, which it's believe the original walls were. At some point (early twentieth century) they were replaced with newer weatherboards. When the cottage was restored in the 1970s, these were in turn removed and the split-timber walls & shingle roof reinstated. This is shown in the photo of photos below.

Bark Mission Hut

At the National Museum of Australia.

Mission hut 2000
built in the style of huts from the 1920s to 1950s, by Herbie Harradine, Lionel Chatfield and Joe Chatfield, under the supervision of Uncle Bill Edwards.

Text on outside panel:

Framlingham

"This hut is just like the first home we built, when Kathleen and I got married, only half the size. Come inside. We share our story so you know what it was like for us."
(Uncle Bill Edwards, 2007)

Framlingham, on Victoria's south-west coat, is home to many Koori families who have fought long and hard for the right to continue living as a community.

Established as an Aboriginal reserve by the Church of England Mission in 1856, Framlingham soon fell under the control of the Welfare Board (also known as the Central Board to Watch over the Interests of Aborigines). The board, which comprised pastoralists, philanthropists, government and church officials, made several attempts to close Framlingham and relocated the Koori families to other missions. Each time, the families protected and resisted leaving.

In 1907, under the Aboriginal Lands Act 1970 (Victoria), the reserve was handed over to the Framlingham Aboriginal Trust and continues under Aboriginal ownership.