Smaller stables

Smaller stable building, for a gentleman's residence, at Franklin House Window: turning the central bar and the pegs push the slates open, to let air in.

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Turnout Seat Buggy

At Entally Estate. Information panel says "The main feature of this style [turnout seat] of vehicle is that the body to the rear of driver's seat acts as a boot for luggage and the lid of the boot opens rearwards, which then converts into an extra seat" and can then carry four people. "This vehicle...

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MV Cartela

Cartela was built in 1912, as a steam powered passenger and cargo ferry, operating on the Derwent River and surrounding waterways. There's not many passengers vessels from that era still in existence, and far fewer that have seen continuous service.

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Entally

This is Entally, built about 1819 by Thomas Reibey, son of horse thief & businesswoman Mary who is on our $20 note. It's an Indian name, Bengali it seems from the Wikipedia article, after a "neighbourhood" in Calcutta. Or more likely, after Thomas's father's business that was named after said suburb of Calcutta. His father...

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Central Deborah Mine, Bendigo – underground

Central Deborah Gold Mine operated from 1939-1954 and extracted 929kg of gold, which would be worth about $50 million today. From website Above ground. Tour starts here. So we travel down in the cage to level 2, and then down ladders to level 3, which is 85.3 m below ground (just belong the horizontal line...

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St John the Evangelist Church, Richmond

St John The Evangelist Catholic Church 1836 Australia's Oldest Existing Catholic Church MASS TIMES 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month 8.30am 2nd, 4th & 5th Sunday of the month 11am Before going inside, I was thinking the 1836 year seems quite late for an "oldest" building, so I pulled a bit from the Archdiocese...

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Penitentiary Chapel, Hobart: Part 2

This is a continuation of Penitentiary Chapel, Hobart: Part 1 In the second part, we look at the other side of the building. Note the building on the left that looks like a two-storey house, the very enclosed yard and the cut-off wall on the right. First though, a wonky plan 🙂 It helped me...

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Penitentiary Chapel, Hobart: Part 1

That is place it was built as a chapel and later used as a courthouse. There are a lot of photos, so I am breaking this into two posts. The second part is here. Now it's owned by the National Trust. Have Trust Membership, Will Use. (Home Hill is a NT property too.)

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Church of England, Hadspen

This is the Church of England at Hadspen. Thomas Reibey of nearby Entally (the house in the other photo) at various times archdeacon of Launceston, state politician & premier, start building this church in 1868 but stopped after a couple of years. And it sat like this for most of the next century -- just...

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Courthouse, Beechworth

Originally published From the information leaflet provided: Built in 1858 of local honey coloured granite at a cost of £3730. It was the central Court of the "Northern Bailiwick" during the gold rush era and closed as a Court House in 1989 after 131 years of continual service. The Court had many roles. It served...

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1929 Marquette

Marquettes were produced by Buick for just 12 months from June 1929 and targeted at the lower end of the market. Marquette Owners Registry for Enthusiasts

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