Water Cart, Horse-drawn

This water cart has two points of interest on the back. On the left is an information panel and on the right is an opening that lets you look inside. The panel says: This water cart was used at the Tasmania Mine to spray the mine year to rest the dust. The driver could operate...

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Concord model thorough-brace coach

Larger image. At the National Museum of Australia (database record, has more photos). The accompanying panel says: Concord model thorough-brace coach 1860-80 This coach may have been manufactured by Cobb and Co. at its Charleville coachworks in Queensland or by a smaller company in the Gunnedah area of New South wales. It was used on...

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Gig

(Larger version Panel at the front say, in part: Gig with Road Cart Body This vehicle is a gig not a jinker, sulky or trap. The differences are that a gig has the shaft running right past the body to the rear of the vehicle. Gigs are also enclosed at the back, but have ample...

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Jinker

(Larger image) This is a light, two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle. But how does it differ from other light, two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicles like gigs and sulkies? Short answer, it doesn't. From "Sulkies, Whiskeys and Gigs" by Jeff Powell, Curator, Cobb & Co Museum in the Australian Carriage Driving Society Show Driving Handbook (PDF): From Cooktown to Kalgoorlie...

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Turnout Seat Buggy

At Entally Estate. Information panel says "The main feature of this style [turnout seat] of vehicle is that the body to the rear of driver's seat acts as a boot for luggage and the lid of the boot opens rearwards, which then converts into an extra seat" and can then carry four people. "This vehicle...

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